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Discussion Starter #1
I have read two disturbing claims.
1) Titebond glue attacks metal fasteners (nails, screws, pin nails).
2) PVA glue such as Titebond I, II, and III will eventually fail unless it is backed up by some metal fastener.
With my recent interest in woodworking I had concluded that PVA glues were pretty good for small boxes and even tabletops.
Are those two claims true and should I consider using polyvinyl urethane glues instead for making small boxes?
I don't have access to wifi at home so I may not get back right away to any responses. But thanks in advance to everyone who responds.
 

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If the polyinyl urethane glue you're talking about is something like Gorilla Glue (the only urethane glue I know of) I wouldn't use it. I've never heard anything about Titebond attacking metal fasteners in any way, but since it has water in it I suppose it might cause some rusting. I've also never heard anything about guaranteed failure of PVA glues; they're what 95% of the woodworkers I've talked to use. The other 5% mostly use hide glue, either in a bottled liquid form or by buying pearls and melting them themselves. While PVA glue hasn't been along that long (in a historical sense), hide glue has been around a long, long time, and a lot of it is still holding.

So I guess the short version is this: I wouldn't worry about PVA glue. It's probably going to last longer than you are. But if you are worrying about it, use hide glue, not Gorilla-type glues.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, amckenzie, for your kind answer. I think it pretty well addresses the issue.
I can't say I'm a fan of Gorilla Glue so based on your answer I won't plan to use it. I appreciate hide glue's long history of good performance, but I do prefer waterproof glue. Thanks again.
 

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No problem.

A note on hide glue: I can't find the link right now, but I saw photos and (I think) video of a guy who decided to test the waterproof qualities of Titebond and hide glue. He used both to glue veneer onto a board, then set the board on his deck in the rainy season. After a week or so, he brought them back inside. Obviously both pieces were pretty well destroyed, but the hide glue had held on at least as well as the Titebond. I'll keep looking for the link, but I wouldn't worry too much about how waterproof hide glue is. Remember that it needs both water and heat to turn liquid again, so unless you're building furniture for a sauna (or live in a rainforest) it will probably be fine. That's not personal experience, of course, but again, I wouldn't stress about it.

I also don't buy it, because I like the longer shelf-life of PVA, so, you know... take this with a big grain of salt.
 

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Titebond is a fine woodworking glue. Everything Amckenzie4 is telling you is correct. The problem with Gorilla glue and other pl glues is that they expand. But they're great for certain functions like gluing prefinished surfaces etc.
 

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PVA glue for anything indoors, but for outside, I like PU (Gorilla for example) because it foams and expands inside the joint. This does not contribute to strength, but it does eliminate or at least reduce cavities that could trap water and start rotting (such as the bottoms of mortices) by filling them with foam.
 

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PVA glue for anything indoors, but for outside, I like PU (Gorilla for example) because it foams and expands inside the joint. This does not contribute to strength, but it does eliminate or at least reduce cavities that could trap water and start rotting (such as the bottoms of mortices) by filling them with foam.
you do know their are 2 type's of gorilla glue, their is the syurp looking and than the white the white will not foam and the syurp looking will , i used to use both but i don't like the syurp kind because you should keep taking off the foam , sometime's you can't get into the small place and get it off, It will not clogg the sanding belt , which is good , my 2 cent's
 
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