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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I'm looking to build a simple stand for my TV, and I want some pros to look over my design before I sink any real cash into the project.

Info on the Project..

The TV itself is a 36" tube that weighs around 200 pounds. Remember the big, flat tube TV's that were top of the line around 1999/2000 before HD got popular? It's one of those.
Here are my plans, whipped up in Adobe Illustrator. I work in CM because calculating fractions hurts my head.

It's more or less a table/box held up with 2x4's. The TV's footprint is about the same as the table, so there shouldn't be much pressure on the center of the unit.



I'm worried about the unit swaying. I could add vertical pieces of plywood to the sides and back, correct?

So, is this doable or an insult to everything woodworking??
 

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Gdog, I would seriously consider applying a face frame to the front of that design to keep the weight of that monster at bay (I had one of those 32" that you're referring to) Also at least on the sides at the top I would fasten horizontal stock the same width as the face to keep it stable front to back as you mentioned.

If you're using screws to fasten it together and if you are actually using fir 2x4s make sure you buy the kiln dried and pre-drill all your holes, especially at the ends. Any splitting from the screws will create a weak spot.
 

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The middle shelf is as wide as the top shelf and bottom panel but cut to just fit inside the width between the 2xs, so it will have a glue line only on the inside surfaces of the 2xs. While it may not seem like much, if you alowed the middle shelf to be the same dimensions as the top shelf and bottom panel, you could let the frame members into the middle panel from two 90 degree directions, and the added collective surface area would offer more resistance to forward/backward movement than what you might think.

If you glue and screw everything soundly, and your "rectangles" are cut precisely out of the middle shelf, I think you would be fine with just a back panel for stability, unless you are fine with side panels. Side panles would certainly make the assembly indestructible but if you do not want them for asthetic/accessibility reasons I think you can skip them if you fuly intergrate the middle shelf.

Disclaimer: I haven't used such a design so I'll defer to anyone who says you need the side panels based on experience. :shifty:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, both of you! The more I think of it, the less likely I could produce the results I want from this plan. I just don't think I have the tools and facilities to cut that much plywood accurately enough.

Another option I have is retrofitting the wooden chest the TV currently stands on so that it has shelving similar to this. Simply put, I'd just add a shelf in the middle, and punch out holes in the front and back.

I'll run the chest idea by my wife (it's hers), and see which of the two plans I would be less likely to butcher.
 

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How about the following simple modifications:

1. add a full back panel of plywood - this will firm everything up
2. add 2x4 front and back cross members that run the full width across the front and the back, just beneath the top. These should be oriented on-end (with the 3.5" dimension running vertically, not horizontally), and this should be screwed to the legs in a lap joint (overlap one another), not by screwing into the end grain.

The additional 2x4's will help support the top from flexing.

But use your own judgment (i.e., the usual disclaimers)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great advice on the extra 2x4’s! I need at least part of the back open for cabling and air flow. A PC and Xbox will be going in there, and I need lots of air flow.

I did some pricing tonight, and it seems the materials for this won’t cost me more than $50. I’m going to re-design the stand tonight, taking all the forum advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've taken all the input and came up with this idea.





I would connect the plywood shelving to the 2x4's using an L bracket on both sides that said shelf connects.


On the far, short sides, I'd run extra 2x4's to prevent the unit from swaying forward and back.


On the back, I would place a back panel that is 1/3 the total size of the rear end to prevent side to side swaying.


Do I need to glue every place wood touches wood on top of using screws?
 

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I was thinking the extra 2x4 would run along the long dimension of the front and back. Maybe all four edges.

Also, your extra piece of 1/3 plywood is in the center, just where the cords will go between the TV, receiver, DVD, etc. Is that where you want it or do you want to invert the design so that it is open in the middle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was thinking the extra 2x4 would run along the long dimension of the front and back. Maybe all four edges.

Also, your extra piece of 1/3 plywood is in the center, just where the cords will go between the TV, receiver, DVD, etc. Is that where you want it or do you want to invert the design so that it is open in the middle?

If I add 2x4's to the tops of all four sides, how do I connect them? Obviously, the first two are easy, as I have done so in the graphics. But what would be the strongest way to attach a second pair of supporting boards?


But, based on what I have so far, am I well on my way to making a stand that won't collapse?
 

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Personally I think your last revision s fine. Routing the cords/cables/wiring around the back panel should not be a problem but you could do as suggested and leave the middle third open and have two smaller panles to the side, or even one panel since it isn't going to be noticeable.

As to your question yes, IMO if your joints are all nice and tight, you pre-drill your holes (because screwing into plywood endgrain can split it easily) and you glue everywhere that long grain surfaces meet, I think it will be fine. Especially if you use heavy guage L-brackets beneath the middle and bottom shelves to fasten to the frame in addition to the screws pre-drilled through the 2xs into the long and end grain surfaces. Individually, these screws into the plywood end grain are very weak, but with all the other surfaces and connectors and glue lines, the sum total effect of these should make the design sturdy. I strees that phrase because you doi have a significant amount of end grain screwing and gluing so remember that until the whole pice is finished and the glue dry, it is going to seem quite flimsy as you construct it.

You can glue the end grain surfaces tooas you assemble it just be forewarned that end grain glue joints even when joined to long grain, adds little structural strength. But the glue surface of the top panel to the top of the long grain frame, is almost enough to keep the stand from racking alone, plus you have the back panel adding purpendicular support.

I think for what it would be used for it would be fine. BUT - it will be top heavy so if you have small children that might be climbing all over it . . . . . .
 
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