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Alan Sweet
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a midi. It only turns one direction.

Observation. When turning bowls or platters, I have observed that finishing can be a challenge.

Normally, I will sand from 100-180. I may start at 120 and may end at 220. But that is my range. Usually I will hand sand with lathe on with the earlier grits. Depending on the "feel", I may use my drill attachment also. I'll always use my drill for the finer grits; 180+.

Most hardwoods seem work well with this approach and finish acceptably.

But, I have had some situations that I have yet to address to my satisfaction.

1) Some woods seem to sand/finish "better" when you can sand on a lathe which can reverse. I have done some pieces that when done sanding a grit, I find the "feel" is "smoother" in one direction than the other. The other way has whiskers. I have taken these challenge plates to my guild shop where they have a couple lathes which can reverse and able to get a much better acceptable "feel" in both directions by sand in both directions.

Is there some way I can address this with my one direction lathe?
(I've even thought abut seeing if I use a power take off on the headstock handle. Also, seeing if I could create some Rube Goldberg attachment that can screw on in place of headstock handle to some how chuck a plate or bowl. Just to get the reverse direction.)

2). Again, related I think. I realize that some grain in some woods will raise after sanding. A number of reasons. I have had (this has happen a couple times ) whiskers raise in one direction after I thought the bowl had been finished properly. This has occurred in both cases a over 24 hours after I was "done". In both cases it was lacquer. I hate redoing lacquer or poly.

So any observations or advice. I think again it has to do with not sanding in both directions.
 

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Sanding can be a challenge. Sometimes the wood species, but more often it is just the grain in the piece.

Some lathe are designed for outboard turning where the hand wheel is removed and an adapter of relevant thread size and pitch is installed. Then mount the chuck and you have reverse.

I have found that some wood just not sand as I like with just a simple circular motion, whether forward or reverse.

I have a 2in and 3in sanding pad which is used in a cordless variable speed drill, takes scalloped pads and allows me to get to some of the areas which normal turning on the lathe does not sand as needed.

Klingspor is a good place to get the pad and discs.

http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/kd50054/

I have also found that my Beall buffing system with the Tripoli compound is useful on all my turnings. It either removes the remaining scratches, or highlights where I still need to sand to remove scratches from earlier grits, tool marks, etc.

The Tripoli compound does not affect applying any later finish.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...de=packard&Category_Code=finish-beall-beal3bf
 

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Check your motor to see it it can be wired to run in the opposite direction. What this amounts to is putting the starting capicator in the run winding and running on the start windings. Check the info on the motor plate. If it is possible you would want to wire it up with a switch to reverse it and not have to rewire it every time you want to change direction.
Tom
 

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Alan Sweet
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tom....

Tom ..TY... You now got the juices running.... I like your idea..

But I also am thinking about getting .. having made an outboard adapter for mounting a chuck out side turning handle .. Need to find a shop which might turn an adapter for me.
 

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Alan Sweet said:
Tom ..TY... You now got the juices running.... I like your idea..

But I also am thinking about getting .. having made an outboard adapter for mounting a chuck out side turning handle .. Need to find a shop which might turn an adapter for me.
If you look in your manual or maybe search online, you can find out what that thread pattern on the outboard side is and just buy an adapter for it. There usually around $20
 

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I have reverse on my lathe and did try sanding in reverse a few times. I could tell no difference. JMHO but if you use sharp sandpaper and a light touch it should cut the wood away. A heavy touch, expecially with dull paper, will bend the fibers over; same as a dull gouge vs a sharp gouge.
 

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Maybe your rpms are too high. You need to turn the speed back and let the sandpaper do its job. Should only apply enough pressure to keep sandpaper in place.
 

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Before you go to all the hassle of wiring/re-wiring your lathe have you thought about Sanding Sealer.
Apply sanding sealer, allow to dry & sand as usual.
You will find the result amazing in comparison.

HTH
Col
 

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Alan Sweet
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now I have used

AL thinned de-waxed shellac before sanding frequently. I have often thought of that as a sanding sealer. Is there another I might try?
 

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AL thinned de-waxed shellac before sanding frequently. I have often thought of that as a sanding sealer. Is there another I might try?
A member of my local Woodturning club makes a product he calls "Dust Inhibitor" which is a mix of mineral oil and bees wax. I have a can but have not used it. The person claims another club member uses it for sanding all the time.

The concept is that this product melts and captures the dust of sanding but should still allow the abrasive to do its work.
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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I am contemplating wiring my lathe with a reverse switch. Dont know if it really makes a difference or not. Thought any electric motor could be reversed but I'm not an electrician

Sanding sealer can make a huge difference to a smooth if finish

I want to try some inertia sanders - many guys swear my them.

I sand to 600 but that is probably because I got the habit as my turning starred with pens.

I like the ski d of mixtures such as Dave mentions and hopes he tries it soon and gets back to us on it. That sounds quite good as I have no D/C system ATM.
 

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Alan,
I do the same as you with thinned shellac as a sealer: normally 2-3 parts DNA to 1 part shellac. Almost any other finish can be used over the shellac if you want a harder finish.


I have an inertia sanders and I swear at mine. They do OK but when you get to the center there is too little wood moving past to do a good job. When you take it off to sand the nub from the bottom they are worthless of course. JMHO but for the same $$$ you can get a 2" power sanding starter kit to use with your drill.
 
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