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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The gearshift knob in my '34 Chevy is plain old plastic. There was a deluxe model available which cost 50 cents in 1934. I have a spare shifter which I've threaded to accept threaded inserts. I plan to make several knobs out of different woods and change them occasionally. I have a block of applewood that I squared to about 1 1/2". The knob is about 2". Do I give it to the turner like this or do I "round" it off by sawing the corners? And I assume he could turn several that we could separate after, is that correct?
 

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My thoughts ,
give the block of wood and the stick to the turner and let her/him do the lot .
It may also be a good idea to let the turner take the car for a drive around the block , get the feel of the shift.


PS.
What wood is the dashboard ?
 

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+1 with Manuca Jock. Give the block to the person doing the turning. Roughing down a block is a very common part of turning.

Just tell the person how many knobs you would like to get out of the block - if possible. Now and again some cracks may be found in a block which contains the pith (the centre of the tree).
 

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Has anyone read the advertisement for the knobs? In the lower right corner, it says the finish resists alcohol corrosion. I guess they did alot of boozin and cruzin back then!
 

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My dog chewed the knob in my 2009 Chevy Colorado. I went out to buy a generic replacement and learned I could not remove the original. Chevy told me I had to buy a whole new stick - $300+

I did what they told me I couldn't do - I made one out of wood. I had a chunk of maple and after I formed a place for my hand, I took it a step farther and carved a dog.

I had to cut the original knob off because there no threads. I drilled a hole on the bottom of my wood shift just a tad smaller the the stick and pounded it on. It has survived 2 NH winters and summers
 

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+1 with Manuca Jock. Give the block to the person doing the turning. Roughing down a block is a very common part of turning.

Just tell the person how many knobs you would like to get out of the block - if possible. Now and again some cracks may be found in a block which contains the pith (the centre of the tree).
I agree with Dave. Apple is very prone to cracking while drying.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here it is. Needs sanding, staining/oiling and polishing. I think it'll look good. I'll cut a walnut plug to put in the lathe pinhole in the top. Can you wax over tung oil?
 

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Landy,
here's a pic of a gearshift knob I made for my jeep about 8 years ago. Its canary wood from S. America. 4-5 coats of lacquer for the finish, then buffed and waxed. It has held up very well and still looks pretty much the same. You shouldn't have a hole in the top from the lathe centers, that can be turned away while it is still on the lathe.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Here it is. Needs sanding, staining/oiling and polishing. I think it'll look good. I'll cut a walnut plug to put in the lathe pinhole in the top. Can you wax over tung oil?
Looking good so far.

A brass pin in the pinhole would look ok too

Oil , wax , and then the polish of use will have that grain lookin' great :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here it is on the stick. Not exactly the same profile as the original. Seems big in the hand. Will have a better idea once I've driven with it.

I bought a basic lathe from an older cousin who is getting out. I'll need a tutorial on how to use it and maybe a book. I'm open to suggestions. Then I'll be able to turn my own knobs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here it is installed. While it is considerably larger than the original it seems ok in the hand. It seems the car handles better with this, there seems to be less vibration and a smoother ride. Haven't checked if the wipers work better......nuff said.

Now that I have a lathe, I'll attempt to turn one in the original shape.
 

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