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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, that might be an exaggeration, but I have a question for you guys:

How can I finish the bottom of this bowl after I part it off?

On my other bowls, I used an MDF disc, cut a channel that matched the rim and then screwed little clamps on to hold it. Obviously, I can't do that here since the edge turns inward and there is no rim.

I am looking for an easy, quick way out. I am in the US Army and I fly to Korea for a year long tour on Saturday, so this is my last bowl for a while!

Thanks for looking!
 

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There are many ways to go at it ... you can still use the jam-chuck method, just not the clamps. You have to make the inside edge of the groove a gentle slant (about the same as a morse taper slant) so that it's *just* a tight fit when the bowl is pressed all the way onto the center bump.

Or glue strips of something rubbery (the underside of a mouse pad would work well) in an X on the face of the MDF disk. Put a live center in the tailstock and bring it up to hold the bowl against the disk -- not too tight so's you don't push through the bottom.

Take very light cuts and leave a small nubbin at the middle where the live center is pressing -- about 3/8" diameter. That last little bit has to be taken off by hand (not on the lathe).
 

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I was going to send you to our club website to see the article I wrote on reverse turning bowls but it's not longer there. Will have to talk to them.
The easiest way is to cut a groove in a large faceplate to center the bowl. Then just push against it with the tailstock. Turn away all you can and then remove the bowl and carve away the last little bit.
On my article I show how to hold the bowl on the faceplate with tape, or use a doughnut chuck, vacuum chuck, Cole jaws, etc.
 

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I was going to send you to our club website to see the article I wrote on reverse turning bowls but it's not longer there. Will have to talk to them.
The easiest way is to cut a groove in a large faceplate to center the bowl. Then just push against it with the tailstock. Turn away all you can and then remove the bowl and carve away the last little bit.
On my article I show how to hold the bowl on the faceplate with tape, or use a doughnut chuck, vacuum chuck, Cole jaws, etc.
John, I had a link to your document in my earlier reply. Original web page not working, I had to do an internet search to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys! - the tailstock method it is. I'll use the MDF disc I already have and try that. The donut chuck looks intriguing, but I need a quick solution.

I actually have a longworth chuck I made on my CNC, but I never did find a local source for the rubber wine stoppers to finish it up.
 

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Make your own stoppers. Buy some of the clear plastic tubing from Lowes and turn a dowel to fit inside. Center drill the dowel and there you go. I've also made square tapered blocks and covered the surfaces with cork sheeting that you can buy at automotive stores as gasket material.
 

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This may not work for you because of the depth of the bowl (the rim may hit your headstock); you can glue up extensions fairly quickly.

I just use a friction chuck. In your case part off the bowl, trim up the remaining and cover with leather, thin foam, etc., and reverse you bowl over it. Use the tailstock to apply light pressure.
I slightly round/bevel the outside edge of the friction chuck. You want the end flat or even concave, not convex.

I just turned a couple of 3/4" thick friction plates with a recess for my scroll chuck jaws. On my Nova with the spindle length, chuck, and friction plate I have never had the rim of a bowl hit the headstock.
I do almost 100% of bowls this way. You can get the nub left in the center down to 1/4" or so before removing the item from the lathe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys. I mounted my MDF Disk and then cut a groove to match my rim. Then I used the tailstock to keep it on the disk. Unfortunately I didn't use any rubber like duncsuss suggested and I ended up with "rim rash" - a little line going around the rim from the bowl slipping in the groove. It was too late to do anything so I finished the bottom that way. I had to do a bunch of hand sanding to get rid of the line... Lesson Learned.

Thanks for the stopper ideas John. It amazes me how much info is available in these forums. You and Dave Paine seem to jump in on every thread and help out so many people - Thanks!
 
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