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This is the second part of how to build a friction call (pot call) used in turkey hunting. In the first part I went through the steps on how to turn a call and now we are going to add our finish, sound board and playing surface.

The type of finish you use is really up to you. I don’t use sanding sealer but there is no reason not too if you like using it. I use a clear stain (Minwax) to bring out the color and grain without changing the wood too much. I use rattle can lacquer because I was a professional model builder for years and can spray that stuff like it came out of an airbrush. I am not a fan of wipe on poly but do like the spray on which gives me a better finish.

Here we go and folks this is really simple.

After the call is turned wipe it down to remove debris. I apply the clear stain to the inside and outside then let it sit for a few minutes. After a few minutes I wipe off the excess then let it dry for a few hours or overnight. I place the call upside down on whatever is handy then lightly spray the lacquer as I turn the piece to insure an even coat. After this sets up for a few minutes I spray it again. I repeat this as many times as each call needs it up to 6 coats. I don’t spray the inside.







To get a glass smooth finish I use professional grade emery boards (soft ones) to buff out the lacquer. I usually start with 600 grit and work my way up to 4000 to 12,000 grit. I buy mine at Sally’s Beauty Supply for under $2 each. They are washable and last quite awhile plus they are available in a wide range of grits.

When the call is buffed out it is time for the sound board. Use Goop glue, period, no substitutes, Goop in the blue tube, that is it, just Goop nothing else. As you might have picked up on this is an important step don’t ask how I know this just trust me. Apply the glue to the pedestal in the center of the call and press the sound board firmly into the glue. I give it a small wiggle and turn it slightly to make sure there are no gaps. Check to see that the sound board is centered in the call then add weight to the sound board until it is dry. If you are doing 3 ½” calls a can of beans or something similar works well.









After the sound board we are ready for the final step, adding the playing surface. Be sure to check the fit of your playing surface BEFORE applying the glue. As we know wood moves and you may find that you need to go back and true the call, I did with this one since the playing surface would not seat inside the rim. This time we will add the glue to the rim of the playing surface not the call. If you try it the other way you will have mess on your hands and your call. Once again don’t ask. Press the playing surface into the call and give it a slight turn. Add your weighting device to the playing surface and allow it to dry.







There you have it your custom made turkey call.



One tip for new turners is go with a 3” playing surface and 2 ½” sound board they are much easier to have come out sounding like a turkey. Just be sure that the wood you leave for the bottom of the call is ¼” thick and you are good to go.

I hope this helps folks that are trying to build a call and maybe gives some other folks an idea about something new to try. Remember these are musical instruments no matter what we call them so there are many variables that can and will change how each one sounds. That is one reason I like making them, they are a challenge and there is no end to the variety of woods, surfaces and sound boards.
 

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Nice presentation and informative.

"Goop" glue is the way to go! I use "Plumbers Goop" glue base on info I saw on a call making forum. I also add a slight "V" groove to the pedestal and outer rim so the glue sinks into the wood. I also use the dispenser tube that comes with the glue to dispense the glue around the wood surfaces. This will help reduce the squeeze out yet provide adequate amount of glue.

I like to soak the complete call in teak oil for 24 hours, remove from the oil and than dry for 24 hours. I than buff on the 3 buffing wheel system. The reason I use teak oil they claim it is used for marine application. I am just concerned with moisture on wet spring days.

I am stick on the 3 1/2" playing surface but I am going to try the 3" surface that you mentioned. Have you tried the "ceramic" surface that is sold by Brookside? Ceramic is fired in excess of 400 degrees "C" for it to devitrify (change from a powder to liquid than to glass). So far I have sold 2 to 1 vs. slate, it is 3.4" in diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
whats it cost to make of these?
would you care to show exactly what you buy to make one
except the wood of course :eek:
Robert everything you need is shown in the pics. A sound board, playing surface and glue. The cost varies depending on the sound board and playing surface. The call in the post cost about $4 including shipping. Slate is running $2.05 per piece and glass is $1.55 I think. Copper is $5.50 as is ceramic. Titanium is high but aluminum is around $2. Any of these can be used as a sound board and/or playing surface but double copper or titanium to me is just too much.
 

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Thanks for posting this. Answered my finishing questions!!
 
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