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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was wondering if anyone has had experience with tuning this tool. I bought mine several years ago when I was first getting started in woodworking. Now I am getting into more serious projects, and I find that the tables are less than perfect when it comes to being co-planer. Has anyone had experience with tuning one of these? (or any jointer with similar mechanics). I've read comments about shimming the tables but can't seem to figure out how or where to put shims. I've experimented with the gibs on the back side of the tables but all they seem to do is take up play.

Specifically, my infeed table seems to tilt very slightly down toward the blades. I've checked this with several different straight edges and they all indicate that this is the case. I have a precision straight edge on order so I can do do a more precise check but I'm expecting the same results.

Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks!
 

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What is the model? Do you have the manual? What does it state about adjusting the table.

If your jointer is the type with dovetail shapes ways and gibb screws top and bottom, the gibb screws take up the slack and also adjust the table. Try backing off the lower gibb screws, and increasing the upper gibb screws.

Sounds good that you have a precision straight edge on order. This made a big difference for the tuning of my 6in jointer tables and knives.
 

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where's my table saw?
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where's my table saw?
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way do you axk?

Do you think the poster knows what a "way" is?

George
If he don't, he will after watchin' the video in the bottom link. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=utf-8&fr=ytff1-tyc-inbox&p=shimming%20jointer%20tables&type=

http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/JointerTuning.ashx

You shim the ways of the tables. If the front of the infeed is sloping down, then adding shims under the top ends of the ways will lift it up.

http://www.scottmorton.com/setting-tuning-grizzly-jointer/
Hey thanks! I went back out to the shop yesterday determined to make progress. I couldn't figure out where to shim before, because I had thought that the dovetails overlapped on the outside like a rabbet. But examining it more closely I realized that they sat flush with each other and that I could slip a shim between them. So after checking a few thicknesses, I cut a piece of .005" shim stock and slipped it into top half where the jointer was low. (I guess this is called the "way" right? Now a "light comes on" in my brain... Back in my printing days we used to call these "key ways.") Well that brought it up to near perfect! In fact it was close enough to start jointing some cherry stock for my table project! As soon as I get my straight edge from Lee Valley, I plan to spend some time checking all four corners.

After years of frustrating results, I really feel as though I am starting to get a "handle" on this machine now! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What is the model? Do you have the manual? What does it state about adjusting the table.

If your jointer is the type with dovetail shapes ways and gibb screws top and bottom, the gibb screws take up the slack and also adjust the table. Try backing off the lower gibb screws, and increasing the upper gibb screws.

Sounds good that you have a precision straight edge on order. This made a big difference for the tuning of my 6in jointer tables and knives.
Thanks Dave, I do have the manual and was hoping to find instructions on how to set the tables co-planer but there is nothing. It does discuss the gibbs, and how they are there to take up slack, but there are no adjustments to set the table plane. So I did a lot of experimenting tightening and loosening gibbs which didn't help much at all. I COULD in fact alternately snug the gibbs until the table was flat, but that left it loose enough so that there was slop in it. And as soon as I try and tighten up the gibbs to take out the play, the table would drop back out of plane. I could actually see the table dropping as I tightened the gibb. I knew then that shimming (to hold it in place as I tightened) was the answer so that's where I focused my attention.
 

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when you get the hang of it...

You will love a smooth working, and accurate jointer. Sharp knives are a big part of the process. When they get dull they start a hammering effect on the wood and you will be able to hear it happening. I sharpen my own knives and then install them, using a setup bar which is a rectangular piece of aluminum 1 1/2" X 1/2" with a reference mark. Other folks use a dial indicator and swear by them. I may make a jig to hold one someday, but so far the bar works pretty well.

A technique I use is to first sight down the board and see where the material needs to be removed initially. I use the joiner like a powered hand plane and remove the "low hanging" material first. On a severely twisted board there will be a happy medium where you can flip the board end for end and remove the least amount of material necessary to get a flat surface...which is the desired result. You need one surface flat, so when you plane off the top on the thickness planer, it won't shift or rock under the pressure rollers.
So I make a pass then resight the board and see where it needs to have more material removed. Then repeat the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You will love a smooth working, and accurate jointer. Sharp knives are a big part of the process. When they get dull they start a hammering effect on the wood and you will be able to hear it happening. I sharpen my own knives and then install them, using a setup bar which is a rectangular piece of aluminum 1 1/2" X 1/2" with a reference mark. Other folks use a dial indicator and swear by them. I may make a jig to hold one someday, but so far the bar works pretty well.

A technique I use is to first sight down the board and see where the material needs to be removed initially. I use the joiner like a powered hand plane and remove the "low hanging" material first. On a severely twisted board there will be a happy medium where you can flip the board end for end and remove the least amount of material necessary to get a flat surface...which is the desired result. You need one surface flat, so when you plane off the top on the thickness planer, it won't shift or rock under the pressure rollers.
So I make a pass then resight the board and see where it needs to have more material removed. Then repeat the process.
Thanks again. I'm going to need to look at the knives once I have the table tuned better. I noticed during setup that one of the knives seems to be just a "smidgen" higher than the other two. It is already working much better than ever before though. :thumbsup:
 
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