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Hi Guys,

I'm about to finish an Interior door for my mom, it's made of solid wood and I am not totally sure what product should I use, My mom doesn't want any stain on it, she better likes to see the natural color of the wood, so I'm planning to use one of these two Oil products and I would like to ask you for some advises.

It's made of Banak wood, I think you guys know this wood as a red good (I'm not sure), it's gonna be at the bathroom so my concern is it's gonna be exposed to alot of moisture so I don't know if I'm in the correct way or maybe Lacquer is the right option.

Any advise on this will be very appreciated.
 

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You might consider a waterbased polyurethane. It dries fast and won't take the repeated coatings that pure tung oil requires. It won't need future coatings either. It will dry clear and be odor free. Of the two oils, I would go with pure tung oil. You can heat the oil in a double boiler and add paraffin which creates a more bodied oil finish
 

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be kind to yourself,waterlox,formbys tung,are tung oil based with resin and driers and do a good job,the pure stuff doesnt dry very fast nor very well,Rockler and General Finishes both sell a gel urethane thats about as easy to use and durable product as is out there, also minwax poly oil does a superjob and is very easy to use,put it on let it dry light sand with 400 or finer and recoat,in a moisture enviorment i would use about 3 or 4 coats
 

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Tung oil causes skin rashes on my face, so linseed oil is the one I use. I fill the pores with sealer or egg glair, and then polish to 1000 grit (used dry). I then put on artists grade linseed oil in very thin coats (the thinner the coat the quicker the drying). I polish the final coat with fine automotive compound and wax with beeswax (cannot get carnauba). Newell in his book regards linseed as inferior to varnish fnishes for durability in wet weather. He recommends a deep soak in thinned spar varnish, rubbing down to the bare wood and then going in for filling and linseed oil. He is probably right. But my stocks have been in plenty of rain and have not suffered for it. Maybe rifle stocks are more sensitive to warpage than shotgun stocks, and Newell worked more on rifles than shotguns.
 

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Regarding the moisture exposure I am with Charles on this one. Especially regarding the Linseed and Tung in pure forms. I woud hate for the door to warp and start sticking or not closing on your mother. Good luck with whatever you choose.
 
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