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Discussion Starter #1
Does any one here have any experience with truss heave/lift?
What is really involved with correcting or eleiminating it?
We live in a ranch style house with vaulted cielings and where the vault ends and return to satndard design, we have a seperation between the cieling and wall. This gap closes in summer and opens in winter. I am getting ready to paint this portion of the house and I am concerned that if I retape and mud the joint it will just crack and reopen later.:furious: I also heard that some people just and add trim, attached to cieling only, so that it will float with the gap. I have concerns about that also, the truss lift on either side of the peak is not equal therefore there probalby would be a gap between the trim at the peak. :censored:
Any advice would be gretly appreciated.
 

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I was gonna say the same thing. In the winter the ground freezes and heaves each side of your house leaving the middle to stay in the original position thus the appearance of the trusses heaving.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From what little I have read it is not a foundation problem.
What I do know it is related to how the upper truss members are at a different colder temperature and at a higher moisture level than the bottom chords. So what happens is related to the changing stresses (expansion/contraction) and movement in the upper truss members which then causes the bottom chord to bow or uplift.
Some of the fixes I have seen may become quite involved, I was just curious if anyone else has had to deal with this.
 

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It is quite common in the northern areas and I've read alot about it but is does not happen in my area. I was very suprised when I heard about it and was sure they were wrong but found out i was wrong.:furious: You might try the DIY sites that deal more with construction than woodworking. Also there was a long thread in the archives on ContractorTalk.com that you could read. I don't think there is much of a fix. K2
 

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Truss lift is more common to northern climates then southern areas, due to the weather extremes. There is a lengthy thread about it on cotractortalk.com. Funny thing is, the more insulation you have, the worse it will get...the bottom of the trusses (chords) remain at nearly room temp and dry, and the rafters take on humidity and length increases, plus temps vay, and you have movement. You can't really cure it by any method except crown molding attached as you guessed to the ceiling, since the lift is rarely more then 1/4 of an inch. I have seen it maybe 3 times in Oklahoma. If you screw the truss chords down to the walls, it can lift the wall also.

After I finished typing this, I remember hearing about a fix: Sprayed on insulation (icylene?) will seal and insulate the underside of the roof, and rafters, and the problem stops. Doesn't hurt your heat gain in the summer months either. win/win fix.
 

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I've had to deal with it several times out my way, - - and yes, - - the best thing to do is hide it with floating crown attached to the ceiling. I use a ceiling-attached backer under the crown to provide adequate attachment.

I even had one home where the drywall would keep separating along the center of the wall (at the 4' point). I gave them a complete trim-design on their bedroom walls, - - letting the horizontal piece at the 4' point float (top sheet attachment only).
 

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I don't like trusses either, Dave, - - REAL MEN STICK-FRAME!! :thumbsup:
Yeah but we can clear span 100ft. or more with a wood truss. Real men would be buying and setting post and beams for days to support the spans and the other guys would be paid and on to the next job.

But I generally like to cut a roof. Trusses have their limits also. K2
 

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REAL MEN STICK-FRAME!! :thumbsup:
Nah. real men don't frame with sticks they frame with timbers. :icon_wink:

Here's a little of whit I did today. the cool thing was it all fit!

Taking of shavings with a 120+ yer year old slick. This beam was harvested early last year at my mother in laws property.

Taking her out to her new home.

Beam me up Scotty!

Gettting there .... I never did take a pic once I got it up. To my suprise, everything went together within 1 1/16" inch tolerance.
Most stick framers may not believe that, because working within a 1/4" is "close enough" for most. :eek:

With timber frming it had better be spot on!

Actually, this project is an amalgamation of stick framing, timber framing, SIPs, and ICFs. Out pantry double as the concrete safe room. So my house building is like my tool buying .... whatever works best for the application. :thumbsup:
Edit: None of these captions went where they were told! :thumbdown:
 

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