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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have my dads old try square, rosewood,'40's...nice. Problem....he was a sheet metal worker and it's kinda...hmmmm....out. Scribes and whatnot have put it outta square. Any ideas????
Outside is BAD!!! Inside ....meh.

 

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Old School
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I pick those up at flea markets and garage sales any time I see them. They do get out of whack pretty easy over time and use. What I've done is to start with a framing square that you know is square. Set in the framing square and clamp both legs to the square until it is tight. You may need to tap it a bit. While clamped drill two holes on opposing corners the correct size for a compression rivet, brass if you can. The drill bit has to be the right size for an exact fit. place the catch portion of the rivet in the underside and tap in the other half with a flat drive pin. Make sure you back up the backside while tapping in to support the action. The rivet should be close to flat when done. I'm not always successful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rivets aren't an issue... the fact that dad used an abrasive "tool" to scribe lines on sheet metal is. The top edge of the square is convex.
What I want to achieve is parallel faces on the leg both in and out. It's too nice a tool to junk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's what I was afraid of...:thumbdown: What should I reference off of??? Another square!!! Wouldn't that just compound an un-square problem??

I have drafting squares but ....if I go too far I'll bugger them up too. Oh well, they're cheap. I'll have at 'er then!!!:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
O.K. Nevermind. I got it closer than I need it to be. Horseshoes and hand grenades I 'spose.:laughing:
 

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O.K. Nevermind.
I was going to suggest that you send it to me to fix...you probably never would have seen it again :laughing:, but it would be a nice little tool once I got done with it. Kingfisher called it, handfile and some careful work.
 

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Cabinetmaker
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On a try square only the inside face is square. the brass plate is the reference plane and the inside edge of the blade is the only one square.
Unlike a framing square which is square on all sides.
For curiosity how did you check this square for square?
 

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johnep
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If blade is convex or concave, the scary sharp method should true it up. I would use sandpaper on glass.
johnep
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On a try square only the inside face is square. the brass plate is the reference plane and the inside edge of the blade is the only one square.
Unlike a framing square which is square on all sides.
For curiosity how did you check this square for square?
:eek: That's news to me.
 

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Extraordinaire
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Me, too...

I like the sandpaper on glass method if it's close...:yes:

Although then I'd be cutting my fingers with my square...Or, it could double as a scraper :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've got a REALLY fine 3 sided fret file and I squared up the outside leg with that and a drafting triangle....now I have to make that parallel with the inside of the leg. I know how I'm gonna get it done...just not looking forward to it.:no:
 

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I picked up one of those new, at an old hardwear store. It had been sitting on the shelf for years. The brass was all tarnished, the steel had rust on it. I think I paid 5 bucks after pointing out the rust. It cleaned up perfect. I did notice the outside wasn't square. Very close but not perfect. Now I know why.
 

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I pick those up at flea markets and garage sales any time I see them. They do get out of whack pretty easy over time and use. What I've done is to start with a framing square that you know is square. Set in the framing square and clamp both legs to the square until it is tight. You may need to tap it a bit. While clamped drill two holes on opposing corners the correct size for a compression rivet, brass if you can. The drill bit has to be the right size for an exact fit. place the catch portion of the rivet in the underside and tap in the other half with a flat drive pin. Make sure you back up the backside while tapping in to support the action. The rivet should be close to flat when done. I'm not always successful.

Clamping the two together sounds like you would have two out of square tools when you remove the clamps.
 

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Hears a thought. Bring it buy you local machine shop and see what they would charge to hone it back strait. It caint hurt to ask.
 

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Hears a thought. Bring it buy you local machine shop and see what they would charge to hone it back strait. It caint hurt to ask.
I don't know why I didn't think of that. I don't mean giving it to the shop, I can just square it up myself with a file. Or a drinding wheel
 
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