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where's my table saw?
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I'm having trouble keeping my wood up against my fence using a push stick any advice?

You have a few choices:
1. use 2 pushers one to push forward the other to push IN, towards the fence. ( Not my preferred method)
2. push the stock much closer to the blade than the fence to gain some leverage, IN towards the fence.
3. Use a magnetic feather board located in FRONT of the blade, and on the cut off side, pressing in towards the fence.
4. use a push stick/block that has a friction or gripping surface on the bottom to allow for pressure IN towards the fence.
:yes:

No. 3:




 
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I'm having trouble keeping my wood up against my fence using a push stick any advice?
I also find it difficult to keep the wood against the fence with only one push stick. Therefore I use two.

One is used to gently push the wood through the saw blade.

The second is used ahead of the blade to keep the wood in contact with the fence. Of course if the wood is wide enough my left hand provided this function.

Works great for me

George
 

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where's my table saw?
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Use a splitter

A splitter or riving knife performs 2 separate functions:
1. It prevents the newly formed kerf from closing on the blade and binding, which may send it up and over, back towards the operator.

2. It prevents the workpiece which is between the blade and the fence from coming off the fence at the rear, because it can't move or rotate away from the fence. This will alleviate many of the issues you are facing and you won't need 2 push sticks...... again, not my preferred method, because I use my splitter.

You must still take care to hold the work down on the table all the way through the cut or it may rotate up at the rear, especially with thinner pieces which don't have any weight of their own. A lot of this is simple physics.
 

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I don't think a person should use a push stick to control the cut. I think the push stick should only be used to push the cut piece of wood past the blade so it doesn't kick back. The control should be handled by the operator. If the stock is too narrow to be safely handled, I rip it half way through and turn it around and rip the other half not needing a push stick at all.
 

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Wood Snob
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Could be your saw needs tuned. Could be the blade is not square to the fence and CC slot. I only us a push stick when the piece is too small for my fingers.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Thanks for reminding me

My push stick is getting a bit worn, so I need a new one. Also shown is my 11th finger.
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Since they are sacrificial I made 3.
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3 new ones, one in "service"
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It got to feeling knarly so I made one knurly. Sorry, got carried away. Dark walnut on the handle, cherry on the ply. I'll only use this one on special projects. Ply is 3/16". Handle is 1-1/4" poplar dowel with a 3/16 groove. 1 small screw holds it in place. HMG works well also, but it's easier to remove the screw than the HMG. Now I have a couple laid back for next time I need one.
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Shown here is my "11th" finger. A simple pencil eraser on a dowel. Totally sacrificial. The other 10 are not. Pardon me Miami fans.
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G'day mates.

Jimmy
 
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