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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello. Could someone advise on how to do a proper transition around the end of this skirt board?

I put a small piece of baseboard there just to show the height. I plan to rip the top profile from the baseboard to make a base cap so it can run along on top of the skirt. The end of the skirt board is flush with the wall at the corner.

Do I turn the base cap to the narrow wall and then run it down, then turn 90 degree to meet the baseboard?

Thank you.
 

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I would run the base unto the stair skirt ending it with a return just short of the inside corner of the stair skirt. I would rip the top profile off some base and use that as the trim on the top of the skirt ending it just short of the corner of the wall so you had some of the wall color wrap around the corner and end at the return on the skirt trim.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
What is your skill level? There is the correct way to turn the corner and there is the work around.
I am definitely interested in the correct way.

I would say I am no pro. More like a hobbyist willing to learn. I have done casing and baseboard in the past, but they were all very straight forward. Have also done some basic built-in like an in-wall shelf.

EDIT.... I just noticed "Stairbuilder" under your name. I recently re-did my railing.
http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/replacing-newel-post-159191/
 

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The way one would turn a corner from rake to level without transitioning to level first requires two different sizes of trim. Since the amount of profile change is dependent in the rake angle it must be made to fit and as such is outside the skill sets of most finish carpenters, so I have some apprehensions about how successful this may be for you. If you are interested there is an article from "This is Carpentry" which goes into greater detail. http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/09/10/raked-baseboard-returns/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the link. Helps a lot seeing the pictures.

I think I will do what the picture shows under "Example 1: Rake to Horizontal". I need to continue the baseboard around the narrow wall. Plus I am not very good with hand tools. :laughing:
 

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Stair systems are full of small anamolies......you know the type.You do a project or part,3 guys look at it...they each ask why you didn't do it "this way"?Its just the way stairs and other complicated shapes and builds workout.

To your question....I don't have an answer without looking at how other places in that system look.Generally,you want consistency within the stairs as a whole.Look to see how other joints are....try not to make one better or worse than others.

There are exceptions to this.....and it usually is around the starting tread/newel.

Just like the English language being rather complicated sometimes......and even though a sentence may in fact be "perfect" in it's structure....."it sounds funny".That's how I explain these sm anamolies on stair systems.

Also,try to understand the climate or environ's that the original stairs were built in.Are you messin with something that will change any historic significance within the house?IOW's,part of the "old house charm" is infact these sm nuances that the original builders adhered to.Be careful changing things just for the sake of change.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.

Thank you for the pointer on consistency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I started working on this, but just realized that one of the walls is really off. The middle section is "caved in" about 0.5". Any trick to make it less ugly when I put the base cap there?

Thanks!
 

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The old trim carpenter saying comes to mind:

Bend and caulk or walk! :thumbsup:

Seriously, there are a few thing you can do:

If you choose to repaint the area, you can float out the caved in section with setting type joint compound, if you are good get some 5 minute mud and you can prime in a short time, if you are like the rest of us get some 90 minute mud :laughing:

Leave it as is and run your molding, caulk behind it (use a backer rod if you have to) chances are nobody will be looking at it as they use the stairs :laughing: But also, the nice thing with moldings is that they create a shadow line, so even though the wall is out, the shadow behind it will hide a lot of the difference.

HTH :thumbsup:
 

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can you find the nails?

If you can locate the nails, I'd pull them out and see if you can pull the drywall out a bit. A hand hole would be easy to fix. I use a 4" hole saw to get inside walls for wiring. Then I glue a strap of drywall in the wall across the hole for support when I replace the round plug out of the hole saw. A little mud around the edges and you're back to "good". You can slip a wedge in behind the drywall through the hole (s) to support it.

If you're good at mudding large areas then this method may seem overkill, if not, you don't have a big learning curve and a lot of sanding and leveling. :thumbdown:
 
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I think you're correct, if so.....

This may be plaster not drywall.
Disregard my entire post. :laughing:

Quote from the OP:
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.
 

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Disregard my entire post. :laughing:

Quote from the OP:
BWSmith, this is just my own 30-year-old house. Nothing of historical value. It was a fixer-upper when we bought it. I removed all the baseboard and am starting from scratch.
At 30 years young there is a very good chance its drywall. Looking at the photo the OP provided, the two edges surely look like drywall where the trim was removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
It's not just drywall. It's very wavy drywall.... :furious:

Thank you for all the suggestions. I am leaning towards building it up with mud.

I tried pushing/bending the middle of the base cap towards the wall and it made both ends of the cap curved away from the wall.

I am not sure if I can remove all the nails and pull the drywall out. I like the idea but that section of the drywall is close to a joint and I am afraid the joint will crack and end up being even more work.
 

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Get a nice straight edge.........and it dosen't have to be expensive.We're talking drywall/plaster here,not checking jointer tables.

I have an ancient aluminum "style" off an old sliding galess door.Even has a nice handhold where the lock was.Looking down it's almost 7' length,it looks dang straight,haha.

Or use a nice 7' pce of plywood.This is your first drywall tool.Aluminum is really better because you can use them for finishing to.....like vaulted ceiling joints.The mud comes off better than plywood straight edges.

Now you get to go around your house and find every place thats "wavy",haha.Once you get a feel for it,you'll be amazed at what this simple tool does in the bigger scheme of things.Like,if/when you decide to put paneling up those stairs......USE THE STRAIGHTEDGE FIRST.getting ready to put a new vanity in?USE THE STRAIGH...well, you get the point.Use it everywhere......great for checking floors too.
 
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Agreed, I have an aluminum angle I picked up years ago, probably from one of the big boxes and it has come in handy time and time again. Great for floating floors. For the wall hopefully you can get away with a large taping knife, a 12" should be good. If not, you can use a 2' aluminum level if you have one on hand, just don't push too hard on it ;-) and make sure you wash it!
 
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