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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I plan on spraying a dresser I made for my daughter using Transtint Dye and Denatured alcohol mixed together in a HVLP gun. I used Poplar for the dresser. I brushed two coats of clear Bullseye shellac; sanding between coats. I know someone out there has done something similar for a finish. What advice do you have before I spray to head off any problems I'm not seeing. Also, can TranstintDye be used over clear polyurethane?
Thanks
 

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Village Idiot
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I've never used dyes in shellac, but I'd imagine you'd have no issues spraying the colored over the clear. Each coat of shellac melts into the previous ones, so itd stand to reason that you wouldn't have any issues. Spraying over poly would be iffyier. Again, it stands to reason that since shellac adheres to poly, usually, that dyed shellac would as well, but again, never tried it
 

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Rick Mosher
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When you spray color over a sealer it is called toning or shading and it is MUCH more difficult than staining on raw wood. It is really easy to get streaks and an uneven color especially when you are applying all of your color that way. Also any time you get a scratch in the finish you see the raw wood so scratches stand out much more. It is a technique I use every day but I would never apply all of my color that way. It is normally used to correct differences in color.
 

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I suggest using 75% Acetone and 25% thinner as your base solvent, then add your tints to achieve the color you want. Using alcohol, when sprayed wet, will "pop" the wood.......unless thats what your looking to do.

Also spray the dye stain straight over the wood. No need for a washcoat or sealer straight on the wood then your dye stain......just go straight to the wood with your stain at an even coat.
 

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You can add transtint to shellac however don't try to achieve the color in one coat. Applying thinner wetter coats you will be able to see what you are doing and make it easier to get a more uniform color.

As others have said it would have been better to put the dye on the wood first and then put clear shellac on. What color are you trying to achieve. Shellac comes in a amber and garnet color. It would be more transparent than the dye.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Evidentially I was given bad advice since the consensus here is to dye the raw wood. I was told that since Poplar splotches so bad to apply shellac to help prevent any splotch in from occurring by NOT allowing the dye to penetrate the wood. I'm trying to archive an "oxblood" type color a deep reddish brown.
What is your recommendation now that I have two coats of Shellac applied? Too late? I plan on going over the dye with several coats of satin polyurethane. Would this be a benefit?
 

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Dondi12, you have a good plan to apply the dye in light coats with an HVLP gun. I would suggest that you put another coat of sealer on first. For example, vinyl. That way the alcohol based dye will not penetrate to the wood, and you will have very fine control over the color.
I recommend that you read Bob Flexnor and Jeff Jewitt. Apologize for spelling errors.
 

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Evidentially I was given bad advice since the consensus here is to dye the raw wood. I was told that since Poplar splotches so bad to apply shellac to help prevent any splotch in from occurring by NOT allowing the dye to penetrate the wood. I'm trying to archive an "oxblood" type color a deep reddish brown.
What is your recommendation now that I have two coats of Shellac applied? Too late? I plan on going over the dye with several coats of satin polyurethane. Would this be a benefit?
Poplar is bad to blotch however a wash coat of shellac is recommended as a wood conditioner if you are staining with oil stains. With dyes a wood conditioner isn't necessary as dyes will color uniformly without being preconditioned.

From where you are I would try to wash as much of the shellac off with dentured alcohol mixed with some of the oxblood dye mixed in. The alcohol will liquify the shellac and having the dye mixed in should allow the dye to penetrate. Try it on some scrap wood first to work out the concentration of the dye before using it on your project. If then the color is insufficient I would mix some dye with alcohol and spray it over the wood until you achieve the color you want and then go back to shellac using it clear.
 
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