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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, so I got this old Stanley no 4 (type 11 I think) and the tote moves to the right a tad, but not to the left. It. Lifts just at the base and I don't see any bending. I know there is a screw on top, but not having had one of these before I want to just screw it down and assume it will work. What should I do?
 

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If you remove the tote you can see the design.

The tote on the Stanley No. 3 and No. 4 use a single screw to attach the tote. There is no toe screw. Instead there is a bump in the casting which fits into a hole in the bottom of the tote.

From your description I expect the hole has elongated to one side and not the other.

I would screw down the tote so that it does not lift and accept the fact it moves to the side. I have a couple which do the same. Not a good design.

When I make a replacement tote I drill the toe hole smaller than Stanley did, to try and get a fit which will not have the side-to-side slop.
 

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Can't really tell what you're trying to say, exactly, but I offer the following advice:
Try tightening it, using the screw in the top of the tote. If it's already tight, but not clamping the handle, you have two choices: 1) grind some length off the threaded rod so as to shorten it; or 2) place one or more tiny washers into the recess in the top of the tote, by slipping them over the threaded rod. Then thread the slotted brass cap onto the rod and tighten.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
So here are some photos. Sorry for the really long response time. I can't see any reason for it to move but this is my first plane and I wouldn't know better. The screw does move in all directions equally when I nudge it, but the tote will only move to the right (when viewed from the rear)

EDIT: So When I reassembled the plane, I nudged this little piece of wood off the surface, and I also screwed the screw into the base before adding the tote back on, this greatly reduced the swing to the right it had. It does move, but not nearly as much as it did (making me feel much better about this plane).
 

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In the second picture, the nub in the sole is very hard to see. Not the best picture. I am not sure if I am seeing the top of the nub having the paint rubbed off. Could just be my old eyes.

If the top of the nub has not paint, this infers the tote has been rubbing on the top and the hole in the tote needs sanding to be slightly deeper.

The design of these totes is not the best. I have Stanley 3/4 planes which have some side-to-side slop.

The only way to avoid side-to-side slop was mentioned by TimeTestedTools in earlier reply. Fill the hole with epoxy and carefully drill a hole to fit the nub. This means drilling an undersize hole and carefully filing to match the rounded shape of the nub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sorry, didn't take a picture of the nub. The nub was fine, no ware on the paint, only spot that had some ware was the paint on the edge of the hole for the screw to go into (can kinda see it in the 2nd and 3rd pic). Also there is no gap, but that blog post will be helpful at some point I am sure so bookmarked :).
 

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The hole is not worn, the nub looks good, and if the bottom lines with the sole and the nub with the hole, the screw is just not tight enough. Sometime you need to shorten the screw or add some washers or spacers to get it tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
timetestedtools said:
The hole is not worn, the nub looks good, and if the bottom lines with the sole and the nub with the hole, the screw is just not tight enough. Sometime you need to shorten the screw or add some washers or spacers to get it tight.
ill give that a shot. I would assume from the end that goes into the hole and not the top? Or does it not really mater as it's a pinching action that stiffens it?
 

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ill give that a shot. I would assume from the end that goes into the hole and not the top? Or does it not really mater as it's a pinching action that stiffens it?
I've always added some washers or a piece of 7/16" dowel under the brass knob. But you don't want the brass to protrude above the rosewood. If that happens I find a shorter rod but grinding either or both ends should work.
 

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Just a note,and it isn't presented to be the end-all,be-all.......use at your own discretion.

Imagine a really valuable SXS shotgun.....Old Parker,or Elsie(L.C.Smith) or whatever?You have "wallhangers" and we have "user's"....not too unlike classic planes?

In shotgun world....IF you are going to use one much,it is highly advisable that the joint between the metal and the buttstock,get's "bedded".

It's done just like bedding a bolt action rifle into the stock.On a shotgun,it ain't so much about accuracy however,as it is about preserving the wood.....in a,wood vs metal contest.

So,it can be looked at EXACTLY the same way with totes on classic old planes.Is it a "user" or is it a highly collected wallhanger.And understand that user means exactly what it is.......we're using it everyday.

If you want to use your plane everyday and it has any looseness in the wood vs metal,you would do yourself and the plane,a great favor to "bed" it.Using the very same tools/techniques that are used in gun world.

Continue regular programming....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not going to lie. I am more confused haha. I don't own any weapons so their care and maintenance are a mystery other than the cleaning part from so many movies.
 
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