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I want to build some floating shelves for a walk in closet, I would prefer that each of these shelves hold at least 150lbs each. After doing a bit of research this is what I came up with.







I plan on using pine to build these, with screws holding everything together while the glue dries. Would this design work for the intended purpose? Would the weight of shelf plus whatever is on top of it rip the hanger bolt out of the 2x4 that the shelf will be mounted on?
 

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Just as a question ... it's in a closet ... why worry about what the shelves look like?
Floating shelves look great on a wall, where the brackets would be unsightly.

On your drawing ... where it's printed in "2x2" ... if you could bolt each end to a wall, too, then I'd guess you could get close to 150 pounds of support.

I do not believe you can get that with just the hanger bolts you are showing. They will bend downward before you get to 150 pounds.
 

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When you put weight on the edge of the shelf, where is that stress cascaded too?

Will the material that is taking that stress compress?

Do you intend to use nuts and washers on the 1/2" allthread?

Your drawing is also lacking some critical dimensions.
 

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You are showing an 80" shelf (assuming normal stud placement) with 6 hangers. That should easily hold 150 pounds.

But, I am with Mikechell. Why would you want to do it? You can build regular closet shelving for much less effort and cost and have a better product.

George
 

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Hi, I love these style shelves, I've got several off my kitchen displaying wife's mixing bowl collection.
The general practice is to use aluminum flatbar long dimension vertical. Think rafter square with the long leg bolted to studs and the short leg projecting out from the wall. The shelf is 100% built offsite with matching slots and just slides on. I suggest whatever you do you kick it back a few degrees so when they sag, and they will sag a least a little, that the slope is lifting up and not sagging down.
The threaded rod, in my opinion, has all the right strength in all the wrong directions.
 

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A three sided enclosure...

A closet is a 3 sided enclosure. It's a perfect situation for a different approach to shelving or a closet pole. I used this "trick" on the kitchen shelves I made to split the tall shelves into 2 shorter sections.

You essentially line the closet with Melamine or what ever plywood your design calls for.... stained Birch, Cherry etc. You build the side and back walls with equally tall pieces attached to the surfaces with a dab of adhesive or just a few screws or nails. The weight of the shelves and their contents is then supported on both sides and the back. Next add a shelf, then add more spacers of equal height and build the interior upward as you go. To change the shelf spacing remove the spacers and add different height ones. The shelf itself never gets attached to anything and is held in place by the weight o9f the upper shelves.

This design uses "faux" dados, the shelves themselves and the spacers giving it that appearance and it's very structurally sound. Hope this explanation is clear...?
 

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the weak link in your design is the drywall. which to the best I can figure out, will play twice in your structural integrity under the shelf and under the bolt heads (??). it is a soft material which disfigures quite easily. a 1/32 to 1/16 of compression will result in a visible sag with that weight.


cutting out the drywall behind the shelf and installing a hardwood should help.
 
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