Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anybody tell me which one is the best, The Tormek Wet Grinder, or the Robert Sorby Pro Edge System, they both cost a small fortune for what they are, so i want to get the right one. Thanks:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
Do you think you need a system like that. I've been turning and carving for a long time and still use a slow speed grinder. I did buy a Sheppac which is kind of like the Jet version of the Tormek. It is handy for putting an edge on plane irons and flat working chisels.
don't get me wrong the Tormek and Pro Edge are nice machines. I do look at them. It would be an interesting decision. The Tormek will defiinitely sharpen tools and keep them cool in the process. My biggest problem with the wet systems is I learned to sharpen by hand and to watch for the sparks to come over the edge. You can never see that with a wet system. The downside in my shop is always having to come up with water. I do like having the strop. It's great for touching up tools if you catch them before they get dull.
I use the scary sharp system of sandpaper on glass to sharpen my plane irons so I kind of lean toward the Pro edge. Knife makers also use belt sanders to shape and sharpen their knives. The downside is having to change the belts but on the two systems I've seen that is really quick and easy. You can leave the belt that you resharpen you tools with on there so it's instantly ready. Then if you need a course belt to reshape an edge it's quick to change over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Can anybody tell me which one is the best, The Tormek Wet Grinder, or the Robert Sorby Pro Edge System, they both cost a small fortune for what they are, so i want to get the right one. Thanks:thumbsup:
I have used both, but not that much. If you are forcing me to choose, I would choose the Tormek, no question.

I bought a Grizzly wet grinder, but I use it with Tormek jigs. I do not recommend the Grizzly grinder. I was trying to save money and thought I was getting something "close enough" to a real Tormek. I am making it work, but you get what you pay for.

Honesty, I do not recommend any of them - Tormek, Sorby, or Grizzly.

If I were to do it over again, I would buy a slow speed grinder and add the two Wolverine jigs. Almost everyone I know uses that setup and prefers it. When I look at professional woodturner demonstrations, they all use slow speed grinders, too. When I called two friends for their advice about squeezing better results from my Grizzly, both confessed that they had gotten rid of their wet grinders and switched to the slow speed grinders with the Wolverine jigs.

Some of the professionals that I have seen do not use the Wolverine jigs, just an angled guide plate. They guide the turning tool grinding by hand, using the plate to set the bevel angle. That takes a lot of practice and experience. Okay, well, sharpening takes a lot of practice anyway.

If you go with a slow speed grinder, find the grinding wheels that work for you - maybe CBN wheels. (I just saw a professional woodturning demo last night. The professional had two slow speed grinders - one had CBN wheels and the other had regular grinding wheels. He said that he prefers the regular abrasive wheels to the CBN ones.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
I have though about Tormek and others a couple of times and slow speed grinders but since I don't do turning so the price doesn't justify getting one. I prefer hand sharping my chisels and planes by hand with diamond stones and a good jig. They are super sharp and easy to touch up once you get the right edge. I have chisels that I don't mind hitting with a mallet and a set for shaving with just hand pressure. I do remember a watching a video once where they compared the Tormek to hand sharpening and then did the paper cut test, the hand sharpened one was the clear winner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
For some reason, I thought that @Dynamode was asking about sharpening turning tools, and not sharpening in general. My post above was really about turning tool sharpening.

I distinguish between sharpening woodturning tools (gouges, etc.) and the other woodworking tools (chisels, hand plane blades).

The Tormek, Sorby ProEdge, and Grizzly, can be used to sharpen many kinds of tools, not just turning tools. My experience with them has been only for turning tools. The wheel grinders (Tormek, Grizzly, slow speed) leave a hollow grind because of the curved grinding wheel. The Sorby ProEdge is an exception - it makes a flat grind. Some people prefer one grind over the other, but both grinds have their advocates.

For flat woodworking tools (chisels, hand plane blades), I prefer flat grinding stones and a honing guide. I use diamond stones and Japanese waterstones with the Veritas Mk II honing guide set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,056 Posts
If every had a Tormek for quite some time and it's my main sharpening system for my lathe tools. I also have a slow speed grinder with CBN wheels and a wolverine jig. It's definitely quicker. I use it for reshaping tools as it removes metal quickly. I like the Tormek because if you set up the jig properly, it hardly removes any metal. Most of my lathe tools are about 15 years old and none aren't ground down to stubbies. Both systems are good, the trick is getting comfortable with whichever one you choose.
Mike Hawkins
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Mike - about your Tormek:
Do you have issues getting an exact bevel match with your turning tools on the Tormek? I use the Tormek TTS-100 (turning tool setter) on the Grizzly, but still do not get a perfect match with the bevel.

Local friends and someone on WoodworkingTalk suggested a Sharpie marker on the bevel, with hand turning the grinding wheel to see what rubs off, then adjust. Is that what you do? Do you have any other tricks or suggestions to get a perfect match between the Tormek jigs, the turning tool bevel, and the grinding wheel? Do you use the TTS-100?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,056 Posts
TA,
The sharpie trick is what I do. Just color the bevel, set your jig and adjust by eye til you think the bevel is riding on the stone. Then turn the wheel you hand, just takes a half a turn and you'll see the shiny mark left. Then make your fine adjustments as necessary. If you don't do that you'll constantly be grinding too much and changing the angle a little bit at a time. When I bought my Tormek it came with a VHS tape on how to use it. Made it pretty easy to get it in service and uunderstand how to use it.
Mike Hawkins
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top