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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been gone for a bit and ready to do some more turning. With my latest Craigslist lathe score it has spurred on the turning bug again.

Any how as part of this Craigslist score it included a Tormek Supergrind 2000 and I was wondering what I need to do (if any)to a Tormek that has not been used in years? I'm most concerned about the leather wheels on the left. I still need to register with Tormek so that I can download a owners manual but I thought I would ask y'all from firsthand experience.



 

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if the leather wheel is really gunked up use the skew like a scraper and gently scrape wheel until it's reasonably clean. Then apply new abrasive to it and your ready to go. The leather wheel doesn't require much maintenance.
I got an N2000 brand new from the pawn shop for $200. I'm still in the process of fixing it up for turning but doubt it will replace my CBN wheel. It does produce a better edge but the replacement wheels are really expensive and I would rather save that machine for my hand plane blades and carving chisels.
 

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I have exactly that model (bought second hand), and it's actually been problem free in the 5-6 years I've had it. You mnight want to take the stone off, just to clean the corrosion (if any) off the shaft. I think you can upgrade these to a stainless shaft (and other stuff) if you want. I intend to do that, just haven't got around to it yet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So the Tormek honing compound PA-70 will condition the leather? Is a N2000 the same as a Supergrind 2000? I need to buy Tormek TT-50U truing tool. Or is their some thing that works better. The best price that I have found for the truing tool is $61.00 shipped from Amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before I put any force on the nut, it's reverse threaded correct?

I have exactly that model (bought second hand), and it's actually been problem free in the 5-6 years I've had it. You mnight want to take the stone off, just to clean the corrosion (if any) off the shaft. I think you can upgrade these to a stainless shaft (and other stuff) if you want. I intend to do that, just haven't got around to it yet.
 

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Before I put any force on the nut, it's reverse threaded correct?
Actually, it's not. As you stand with the wheel in front of you it's lefty-loosey. I had to go double check....
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks! I just checked the threads to look for any corrosion but the threads were clean. I did notice that at this point I could slide the shaft out which I cleaned and re-greased. I also sanded/polished the drive shaft along with the friction rubber wheel. I read that over time grime/saw dust can cake on there which creates motor slippage.
After cleaning


Before cleaning

 

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I know I'm late to chime in but...

One thing you need to do is check to see if your wheel is flat and true. You don't need any special tool because you have it already. Put the bar that hold the jigs flat against the wheel. It should make contact across the whole wheel without any light shining between the rod and wheel. If you see light on one side or the other - or see light in the middle... your wheel is not flat. It needs to be flat to sharpen properly. If you need to true up your wheel - you need this http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/T...serID=43705943&SessionID=9hSLsgAWhIKDIoGMNLao
 

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Fb,
your machine looks to be in good shape. The one other thing I do with my leather wheel is to occasionally put a litte bit of neatsfoot oil on. It keeps it from drying out and makes it easier to apply the lapping compound to it. There is an updated shaft that your jigs mount to. The two ends that fit into the mounts with the tightening knobs are threaded with a round locking wheel on each one. It makes it really easy to fine tune the angle of your tool to the stone. A grading stone is also good to have. It lets you change the coarseness of the stone and true it up if its not too bad. When you do get around to sharpening, it helps if you move the tools back and forth across the stone to even out wear. If you leave a tool in one spot, it will form a groove in the stone that will then have to be flattened out. The other tool you mentioned for straightening out the stone is good to have also. I didn't check the link, but if its the latest version, it should have a threaded shaft that the cutter rides on. You just turn a knob on the end of the shaft and it slowly moves the cutter across the face of the stone, making it very easy to get a flat surface again. This should be followed up by the grading stone. Good luck with it,
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the great tips! Once I get back from vacation I'm going to pickup

TT-50 truing and dressing tool
TTS-100 tool setter
SVD-005 upgrade kit to re sharpen my carbide cutters

Should I buy Tormeks honing compound or is their a better/cheaper alternative?
 
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