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Galoot & Ephemerist
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33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks

I was going to post this through the blog, but first the toolemera site belched then the blog server started acting up. Either this is the end of the internet as we know it or some server ate too much chili.

So here is a notice of a couple of new Cabinet Cards at the site

Shipbuilders at work. An albumen cabinet card copy of a full plate tintype. Exterior shot of a large ship under construction. I have no idea what kind of ship, where this is (supposedly New England) or what the various shaped timbers in the foreground are for.

Shoe Factory interior cabinet card. A nice spur of the moment image of what looks like a final assembly or fitting department of a large shoe factory. Take a close look at the kerosene burners with what looks like burnishers sitting on them. Once again, my fund of knowledge of shoe manufactory equals my knowledge of shipbuilding.

www.toolemera.com

Enjoy
Gary

PS: Some new stuff at the blog too
http://toolemerablog.typepad.com/toolemera/
 

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Galoot & Ephemerist
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33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
More hulls

Folks

I've been pondering that cabinet card of the ships hull. Some folks have suggested it's a barge or a Great Lakes Lumber Schooner. A bit of research even suggests it could be a Great Lakes Consort Barge, sort of a cross between the barge and a schooner. All this led me to inflict my blog upon you once more.

http://toolemerablog.typepad.com/toolemera/

Best
Gary
 

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Ship

Folks

I've been pondering that cabinet card of the ships hull. Some folks have suggested it's a barge or a Great Lakes Lumber Schooner. A bit of research even suggests it could be a Great Lakes Consort Barge, sort of a cross between the barge and a schooner. All this led me to inflict my blog upon you once more.

http://toolemerablog.typepad.com/toolemera/

Best
Gary

This could be a Great Lakes schooner that was used to carry rocks for balast for other ships, steel and also for lumber. My wife's great great grandfather ran This one on the Great Lakes in the 1860's. SCHOONER JESSIE DRUMMOND
Other names : none
Official no. : C51455
Type at loss : schooner, wood, 3-mast
Build info : 1864, A. Simpson, St. Catharines Canada as a bark
Specs : 134x23x12 291gc
Date of loss : 1902, Dec 2
Place of loss : near entrance to harbor at Cobourg, Ont.
Lake : Ontario
Type of loss : storm
Loss of life : none of 7
Carrying : 600 t. coal
Detail : Struck bottom and settled while trying to make Cobourg harbor in a gale. Pounded to pieces.
Crew rescued by Cobourg Lifesaving Service. Registered out of Oakville, Ont. to Herbert Milne.
In 1865 she carried a load of steel rails from Hamburg, Ger., to Ont.
When built she was iron strapped and wire rigged. Converted to schooner in 1874.


Check this site http://www.boat-links.com/boatlink.html


Gary (Seawolf)
 

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Galoot & Ephemerist
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33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This could be a Great Lakes schooner that was used to carry rocks for balast for other ships, steel and also for lumber. My wife's great great grandfather ran This one on the Great Lakes in the 1860's. SCHOONER JESSIE DRUMMOND....

Check this site http://www.boat-links.com/boatlink.html


Gary (Seawolf)
That is one great site for maritime links! The specs you gave for your great great grandfather's schooner seems to fit the size of this one (a little guesswork with an scaled ruler). I couldn't figure out why a barge would be built on the New England coast. The Atlantic is not the friendliest of oceans. Would you mind if I added your comment to the site & blog? It's as close to a spot-on identification as I've seen.

Thanks
Gary (the other Gary)
 
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