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Extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter #1
I got to thinking the other day while the wife and I were working in the garage and cleaning some things up that it's probably high time to write a tool inventory list, including specs and pictures, of all the items in my shop...you know...just in case.

I guess my reasoning for doing this is insurance. I once had my luggage stolen while traveling in Europe, and the insurance company wanted to know what I had, when I purchased the items, their condition, and how much I originally paid for the items. From that, they could depreciate for use and figure out how much to pay me for them.

Any of the rest of you inventory your tools? Keep track of purchase date, condition, etc.???
 

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Yes, I keep a log of what I bought, where it came from and how much was paid for it. This helps when it come to matince and where to get parts.
 

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I did that a few years ago. I took a video camera and filmed all the tools and a close up of the serial numbers where possible. I also created a spreadsheet with the models serial numbers and prices. Your post reminds me that I should update since I have added a few more tools since then. :thumbsup:

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My insurance company requires it (course that is business insurance) I think it is a good idea for homeowner insurance too. One of my buddies walked around with his camcorder videoing all his stuff...6-7 months later he was robbed. He could not even remember what he had exactly, the tape helped big time.
 

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Extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter #5
Daren,
Thanks for the reply. That's sort of what I'm thinking as well. We talked about my tools as well as our wine collection with our insurance agent, and he said it's all covered under our regular insurance plan. We added additional insurance for jewelry and some rugs that we've got. We are currently trying to put a value on the wine. I think I'll also try to put a value on shop equipment and tools before we talk to him again...He may need to add a rider for the increased values...
 

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JWB Services, Inc
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Keeping inventory,pics, and reciepts are a MUST if you are in business. I learned the hard way almost 2 years ago. July 3 7am rolled on site to install some exteriors. Finished the first house and while moving to the next I ran over a lot of nails (kinda suspicious) flattened 2 of the 4 tires on the trailer. I only had 1 spare with me so I dropped the trailer 2 flats and framers 2 houses over no biggy. I was gone for 25 min NO S*** and when I got back no trailer!!!!!! And gues what nobody say anything....:censored: Called the framer at home his crews did not speak English to he interp--- told him I had to call the cops to file a report. Funny thing is when the cops rolled up the job site was empty they where illegals I had NO WITNESSES stating my trailer was there!! Framer came in to vouch since he was there at 7 when I arrived. Got thing was I gues there where 10-13 other trailers stollen in a simular manor during the weekend (nails in tires) Sorry so long.....It took 10 months to settle with the ins company because I did not have proper documentation on all the tools in the trailer I know I lost over 25G in that 1/2 hour but my policy maxed out at 20G. I now keep excelent records of what is in the trucks and trailers with pics and reciepts to back it all up! Take it from my experience good records are worth their weight in gold!!!!!!:thumbup:
 

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I try to keep a spreadsheet updated....(due for an update!:blink: ), plus I also keep a bunch of pics of most of the stuff. I keep my manuals in a file cabinet with the receipts stapled inside them.
 

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Thumb Nailer
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2,454 Posts
I am currently in the process of doing just that. I am not sure how to write in certain things though. Like my bench grinder and vice, not to mention a LARGE number of various Vermont American drill bits and hole saws were given to me when the Ace Hardware store I worked at in college shut down. (The owner was going through a divorce and liquidating, he had no room in the 1br apartment he would up in...), at least one tool was left in my old apartment when I moved in and I could never find the owner (Makita quarter sheet sander). I still have the receipts / credit papers from my Snap On stuff. I think the hardest ones to figure out value on will be the toolboxes. I have a Craftsman roll cabinet that has been out of production for a few years now (and would be FURIOUS if I lost it, I LOVE this box!), and a Stanley Proto 6 drawer chest that I received as part of the tool kit when I started in tech school in 1990. Stanley / Proto DOES still make a 6 drawer, but it is very different. Again, I would be furious if I lost this one...

I KNOW I am missing tools. They are probably stuffed in a box somewhere. My wife and I are busting our backsides to get the home repair, and organization taken care of. Hopefully in that process, my Snap On and Stanley screwdrivers, a couple of Craftsman Impact sockets, etc... will re-appear. Along with about $1K of DVDs, and about $500.00 of CDs (long story, former roomate, sticky fingers from SOMEBODY he brought into my house...)
 

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I guess I need to do more than what I did. I just took a ton of pictures of everything, put it on a disc, and gave a copy to my neighbor and we did the same thing at her house.
 

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my insurance policy just has a dollar amount on it. i asked about making lists, ect when i was getting it. they said the policy i was getting was a dollar amount policy, so every category has a value.
 

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This is a great idea but where do you start. I have shop tools stored in my brothers shop because I dont have the room for them and absolutely refuse to get rid of any. And hand tool, wow that would take months. I will have to do it now though, because my wife has been reading over my shoulder and said things like "Why dont you do that". I did make a spread sheet for my guns, but I only have about 20 or so, so it didnt take long. My insurance will only cover $10,000 on out buildings, and because I spend all my money on tools I can't aford better insurance.
 

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Extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter #16
I was going to use a spreadsheet, but realize that they are not very user friendly. More appropriate would be to create a database to enter the information into.

I'll dust off my brain and see if I can remember how to create a database...somehow. Then I just need to know what fields to enter for the items...

Here's a start:

1) Manufacturer
2) Description
3) Model Number
4) Serial Number
5) Date Purchased
6) Where purchased
7) Purchased New or Used
8) Purchase Price
9) Condition (this is really subjective, but I've got to have something)
10) Have manual (yes/no)
11) Accessories (list)

what else?
 

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Extraordinaire
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Discussion Starter #17
Well, it appears that somebody has done most of the hard work for us :thumbsup: If you have Microsoft Access, there is a template for Household Inventory. It's pretty complete, but may need some modifications. I'll see what it takes to change the database from my "list of stuff" above. It even has a place for pictures.

Here are a few snapshots of what it looks like:
 

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Senior Member from MN
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219 Posts
This is a really good idea. I'll have to put this on my list.

On a tangent topic, before I had my basement ceiling re-sheetrocked, I videotaped all of my audio/video cables, security cables, cat5, plumbing, electrical, etc. I have a lot running all over the place. I did find a use for it once since then. Saved the guesswork.
 

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Extraordinaire
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