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Does anyone else get bothered by having different locks for two or three different boxes of the same brand/set? Has anyone thought of making some sort of exchange where I could exchange say one of my craftsmen locks with number 8011 to someone with lock 8012 if they are each looking for the other one? Stupid to have to buy a matching lock set when there are surely others with the inverse situation.
 

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It would depend on the number of different lock codes (key codes, I presume) that exist. There could be thousands of lock codes, reducing your chances of finding a match to near zero, even if you find someone with a compatible lock.

A typical home door lock has five pins. There are six different pin lengths, which means that there are 6^5 (six to the power of five) = 7,776 possible house keys. Your Craftsman lock has a four digit lock code is 8011. If we assume that any digit is allowed, then there are 10^4 = 10,000 different lock codes. Assuming that someone has that Craftsman lock, the chances that you will find a match are too low. My guess is that it will never happen here on Woodworking Talk. If they have another brand of lock, who knows?

After that, there is the trust issue. Frankly, I would trust most of the people here to mail me their lock while I mail them mine, but you never know.

My advice would be to see if your locks can be easily rekeyed. If you understand locks, rekeying locks is pretty easy. I have done it many times on different kinds of locks.

Better: Figure out what kind of lock cylinder you have in your Craftsman toolboxes, and order three compatible ones keyed alike. They will be much cheaper than paying a locksmith to rekey your existing cylinders, and you will probably get better cylinders, too.
 

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It looks like Craftsman will just sell you a matched set, at least for some of their tool chests: I did a quick search for "Craftsman tool box lock", and came up with a bunch of options. Depending on how many you need, though, you might be better off calling up a local locksmith.
 

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I've never bothered to lock mine except for the first time when I first bought it. After that it's been unlocked ever since..I still have the keys though hanging up in the very same spot I originally put them.. I figure that someday I might want to use the locks for some other purpose, but until then they're just sitting there collecting dust and the occasional overspray from painting and such..
 

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If you are a tradesman who carries his/her tools to different job sites a lock is a good thing. If you are a home worker, like me, then locks are not necessary.

George
 

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If you are a tradesman who carries his/her tools to different job sites a lock is a good thing. If you are a home worker, like me, then locks are not necessary. George
Unless you have small children with easy access to the tools. Once they reach the age where they can be taught and trusted, then you're right.
 
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