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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My parents gave me a rocking chair I had as a kid, thinking that if I could fix it my daughter could use it. It had been stored in the basement in the vicinity of their water heater, and had gotten wet when the tank sprung a leak.

The solid wood parts were fine, but the seat was veneered chipboard and delaminated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So, I figured I'd fix it up and take some pictures along the way.

Here I glue up a panel of rough quartersawn white oak and then scrape off the squeeze out and smooth it out starting with a #5 and then a #6, both my grandfather's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Then I finish it up with a jointer and smoother plane, disassemble the chair and trace the old base. Next I cut the new base on the bandsaw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I decided to try the steel wool and vinegar method of staining the pieces to match after sanding and scraping the old finish off. The new white oak turned jet black while the old, possibly red, oak took more of a gray-brown, despite some tea rub to increase tannin content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I decided to even the tone out with some java gel stain, which turned out terribly. This was only because this was my first time using gel stain, and I followed the directions too closely... apply liberally and then spread around yielded a paint-like coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I turned back to my card scrapers and cut back the gel stain and cut through some of the iron acetate stain to give a layered look... this was sort of what I had in mind to do with the iron acetate anyhow, but now it was a bit of a necessity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After cutting back the gel stain, I sealed the wood with two coats of danish oil, then used the gel stain as a glaze after reading up on it. This time it went much better. After that dried, I applied three coats of Arm-R-Seal and it was done!

Not pictured: drilling the straight holes for the dowels with the drill press and the off kilter ones with a bit and brace. All in all it was a pretty fun project.
 

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