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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished a cherry table top using poly for the first time. I applied 3 coats, sanding between coats. It came out pretty nice, except that there are white streaks. What I think happened is that I either didn't get all the sanding dust of before the second coat, or I screwed up one of the early coats when applying the poly. In any event, the white streaks are not on the surface, so I can't just sand them off.

Does anyone have an idea how I might be able to mask them or get rid of them somehow without stripping the finish altogether? It's a clear coat, so I don't want to tint it. All ideas welcome! Thanks

I've included a pic, but I don't know how well it will show online.
 

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Is it a water based poly or solvent based? If it is not sanding dust it could be blushing if it was humid when you applied the finish. With poly not much you can do that I know of. Might try light sanding and a thinned out fiinish coat again. It might rewet the prior coat and release the moisture -- Doubt it. Hope it's something easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks eagleeye and cabinetman. So what I used is Minwax indoor/outdoor Helmsman spar urethane, in clear satin. The can doesn't say whether it's water- or solvent based, but I'm guessing solvent because of all the nasty warnings about ventilation and VOCs, and the marketing language talks about its "special oils allow the finish to expand and contract...."

If I don't want to strip the wood altogether, is it possible to sand it back down to the wood and re-urethane it? I've got three coats of poly on it. Thanks.
 

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Thanks eagleeye and cabinetman. So what I used is Minwax indoor/outdoor Helmsman spar urethane, in clear satin. The can doesn't say whether it's water- or solvent based, but I'm guessing solvent because of all the nasty warnings about ventilation and VOCs, and the marketing language talks about its "special oils allow the finish to expand and contract...."

If I don't want to strip the wood altogether, is it possible to sand it back down to the wood and re-urethane it? I've got three coats of poly on it. Thanks.
If it's natural wood, then that would be the way to go. 120 most off and then go to finer grits when most is off. And yes it is solvent based not water. so wear dust mask when sanding please. :yes:
 

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I wouldn't use a spar varnish or spar urethane on interior furniture. The oil/varnish ratio is a long oil content, and it takes a long time to cure/dry. It doesn't dry to a hard finish, but remains somewhat flexible. I would chemically strip the finish off, and use a wipe on version of an oil base varnish, or other top coats, that can be sprayed such as waterbased polyurethane. You could use lacquer or conversion varnish if you are into solvent based finishes.






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