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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok just started getting into the hobby and I would like to make some outdoor furniture-
Not too important, but still the quality of wood I am using is big orange's pressure treated 1x4's

Cheap, mostly crooked-

I tried to get the straightest pieces I could find- and I cut with a 96t blade on a 12 inch dewalt miter saw...

Measured 3 times and got this....



Wood Wood stain Hardwood Lumber Plywood



Wood Wood stain Plywood Hardwood Lumber



Wood Furniture Hardwood Table Plywood


So as you can see the pieces of 1x4 must have had a trapzoid shape--

My question is what do others do to prevent this?? Better wood? Do u actually cut all ur sides to ensure square?

Or do you full with wood glue / sand and carry on with life?

Thanks in advance for your advice...
 

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where's my table saw?
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don't trust either the wood or the saw setting

Theoretically, the wood should have square ends, but maybe not? Take a scrap, cut it at your "locked 90 degree" setting. then check it with your best square. The setting may be off just a bit, if so, adjust and recut.

For the best fit, always trim off the factory ends of boards with a properly set miter saw or a circular saw and square guide. :yes:

To prevent "workpiece creep" double stick some 100 grit sand paper on you saw fence out of the blade path. Clean your saw blade often when working with PT wood, usually pine or spruce with lots of resin which gums up the blade quickly. See the thread just posted on cleaning saw blades:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/cleaning-saw-blades-59375/
 
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where's my table saw?
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When they make the pressure treated wood the stack of lumber is inserted in a water tight tank and saturated with the chemical under pressure so the chemical is deeply penetrated into the wood. Then it is allowed to air dry, for the most part in the store. Sometimes the wood is dripping wet when you buy it. Therefore the wood often dries crooked, bowed and sometimes wider at one end than the other. To build furniture out of it you kind of need to re-run the wood S4S again in order to make accurate parts out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
S4S??

Saw for straight

Never mind I'll google that...

About the pressure treated wood- I figured that mostly you just get non-straight pieces, just thought there were tricks everyone else did to deal with it... Thanks for the advice--- getting a new blade tomorrow.
 

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S4S = Square 4 Sides

But saw for straight works good too since you need to saw straight to get those square sides :)

My first project was made with red oak S4S since I had no way to plane it flat or joint the edges. Being able to square your own faces and edges will enable you to use a wider variety of wood species.

I'm not very good at teaching so hopefully this makes sense, others on here can explain it better perhaps.
 

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S4S is surfaced 4 sides. At the time they do it at the mill, the board will actually be true and square. By the time the lumber is at the yard it will frequently have lost moisture, and tweaked, picking up bowing, twist, cupping, crooking, and or kinks.
 

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S4S??

Saw for straight

Never mind I'll google that...

About the pressure treated wood- I figured that mostly you just get non-straight pieces, just thought there were tricks everyone else did to deal with it... Thanks for the advice--- getting a new blade tomorrow.
lumber is often bought rough, often called rough sawn with all 4 sides right off the saw at the saw mill. Further prcessesing is often done at the planer mill which allows you to purchase partially or fully milled stock. Stock purchased S2S means surfaced 2 sides usually milled on a machine called a straitoplane which joints one face flat like a jointer would, then surfaces to thickness like a planer does. 4/4 stock initially 1" thick, that is machined S2S will often be finish machined at 25/32" to allow for a sanded finished thickness of 3/4". S3S means surfaced 3 sides. The S2S lumber is straightligned one edge on a straightline rip saw. S4S means surfaced 4 sides. Stock bought as S4S such as a 1x6 will finish 1/4 inch thinner and 1/2 inch narrower than rough sawn.. Thus a rough 1x6 will finish at 5 1/2 wide and 3/4 thick as I'm sure you've noticed.

Redwood, western red cedar, and many other species will work much better than pressure treated for outdoor furniture. PT really shouldn't be planed and exposed for a variety of reasons. It can be used if proper procedures are followed, it is allowed to thoroughly dry for a period of months while being fastened to prevent warp, then use paint or an opaque or semitransparent stain after thoroughly dried, etc. Good luck in your research and ask questions as needed. BTW special fasteners are required also.
 

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I make all my outdoor furniture from chopped up fresh freight pallets. I get 5 per winter anyway with 5 tons of pellets for my wood stove. Skilsaw, some 2x4 and a lot of 3" deck screws.
Chairs and tables, coffee tables, plant benches (I grow grape vines), garden benches, work benches for stone carving. It all can sit out there, unfinished, until it rots. Then into the fire pit. I'll make more furniture.

11PM in a BBQ, I might have some guests who are at the point of being unable to tell square from round.
 
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