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Hi. Does anyone know the best way to cut large, precise, angled cuts like the ones on these stools? (I imagine the stools are about 18 inches tall.) Thanks. ...And BTW, thanks for all your help and advice so far with my other posts guys. Your generosity with your knowledge is beyond appreciated.
 

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where's my table saw?
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one way is to ...

Make all the cuts first using a chain saw, electric or gas powered depending on your shop. Stop the cuts short of "through" and finish with a hand saw. Clean up all the rough surfaces using a combination of large disc and hand held belt sanders. Some hand chiseling may be required. It's more of a "sculpture" than a woodworking project in my opinion, having done both kinds of work.

It's too tall for all but a huge commercial bandsaw. A 16" or 10" hand held circular saw would work on some of the cuts, but not all.
 
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I would do it by making a sort of frame and then use my track saw. You can easily make a track guide for your saw if you don't have one.
The idea is that the portable saw is moving along and supported by the track or guide, and the block is below it at an angle or angles. The saw cuts what it encounters.

A table saw is an option, again the wood is held in a frame or support. For example, take the square block and lift up one end, then clamp it between two pieces of plywood so it is held off the saw table at one end. This will make that tapered cut. Now, put that on a table saw sled at an angle (clamped down) and you will get the compound angle.

I would be tempted to cut it all with my japanese rip saw, just for fun, but you have to like sawing wood by hand with a sharp saw, and it will take a little longer.
 

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I'm with woodnthings on this one.
I doubt they're precision cuts ... they're precision finished cuts.
Be very sure the original stump/piece is secured, then make the rough cuts with a chain saw.
Finish with wood chisels, hand planes and sanding blocks.
If you have a very sharp hand saw, you might be able to make near finished cuts with it.
 

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where's my table saw?
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How will the track saw work?

How can you make a cut of decreasing depth on the block as shown. It will certainly make the straight cuts easy enough, but I don't see how you would vary the depth....?
 
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There are still some cuts that can best be cut with non-motorized hand saws.
I would use a hand saw on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I would be tempted to cut it all with my japanese rip saw, just for fun, but you have to like sawing wood by hand with a sharp saw, and it will take a little longer.
Thanks. Sounds interesting Brian. Is there a specific model of Japanese saw you would recommend for this? :)
 

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I don't know enough about Japanese saws really. I do own a madonoko, which means 'window saw' that is about 40" long and 8" wide and designed to work on timbers. It's hand made, over 50 years old and has never been used, and called a window saw because of the large gullets, or windows, cut into the blade. I've never used it but would be tempted to try it for this.
It is similar but larger than the one in the first video at this site:
https://sites.google.com/site/japanesetooldescription/home/japanese-saw

To return to your project, and to evaluate the suggestions you have recieved, I think my track saw suggestion isn't so good, because you don't get the depth of cut you need. The chainsaw ideas I wouldn't do either, because of all the work required to get from what the chain saw leaves you with to that very precise and flat cut in your images. I think you need a very sharp handsaw, perhaps a bowsaw. How sharp it is determines how much you will enjoy the work. Beeswax on the blade and teeth will help things. I think what you use is what you have, or can get.

The correct power tool might be a ship-saw, which is a very large bandsaw for cutting large timbers for boat making.
 
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