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I am about to build a timber-framed shed / garage. I have access to Red Oak logs I will be getting milled, but I would prefer using white pine. What do you think is the chance of me trading the red oak for some white pine? Does anyone have experience trading lumber and how do you go about it? Can I trade it at a sawmill?
 

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welcome to the forum, Ted. what part of the country are you in ?
if you have a lumberyard or sawmill near you, I would suggest you contact them directly.

.
 

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I am about to build a timber-framed shed / garage. I have access to Red Oak logs I will be getting milled, but I would prefer using white pine. What do you think is the chance of me trading the red oak for some white pine? Does anyone have experience trading lumber and how do you go about it? Can I trade it at a sawmill?
I curious why you would want to build out of pine instead of red oak?

I haven't had much luck getting lumberyards or sawmills to trade logs before but I have had luck trading with the loggers directly. If you can't find a lumberyard, sawmill or logger that is willing to trade you can always use craigslist.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Just go ahead and mill the logs ....

I am about to build a timber-framed shed / garage. I have access to Red Oak logs I will be getting milled, but I would prefer using white pine. What do you think is the chance of me trading the red oak for some white pine? Does anyone have experience trading lumber and how do you go about it? Can I trade it at a sawmill?

Now you can keep them for future use or sell all or parts locally. They will need to be dried at any rate. I just think you would have a more marketable product if they were already milled, BUT the question is ...
how many logs, at what yield, and what sizes to mill them.

As far as using Pine for your shed, that depends on local environment and how much exposure to the elements they will endure. Probably some sort of preservative treatment is in order if they will bet set into or on top of bare earth. Some research into what construction methods are used should reveal what works best in your area. A block footer around the perimeter may be best... i donno?
:vs_cool:
 

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mike44
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Red oak will rot quickly. Pine is a much better choice. Woods like cedar, black locust , white oak etc are best if available. In 1964 I built a fence with black locust posts for a relative. The posts are still there , though the rails and pickets have been replaced several times.

mike
 
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