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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a Stickley-inspired crib for my sister's first child. Although months of work and nearly a thousand dollars have gone into it, It just donned on me that the main structural component that will be supporting the mattress support is going to be 4 bolts in 4 threaded inserts, 1 in each of the 4 legs. I am having a hell of a time getting any of the inserts I've tried to flush-mount without tearing out and lifting all of the surrounding QSWO. Any ideas on types of inserts or how to get the to look like they should?
 

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I <3 the smell of sawdust
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I recently put some inserts in some walnut and my test piece had the same issue.

What I did was to put a screw with 2 nuts (to keep them from moving) into my drill press, use the handle of the drill press to apply enough pressure to keep them from pulling the wood up, and turned the chuck by hand. I did 8 of them without any issues other than a sore hand/forearm from turning the chuck. It probably would have been easier if I had removed the drive belt.
 

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When I drive in threaded inserts, I first make a test hole in some scrap of the same material, then test my process to make sure the insert goes in straight and easily. Then instead of using a slotted screwdriver or allen wrench I'll use a long hex head bolt of the same thread, double nut the shaft to lock it down on the insert. Then I can use a wrench on the bolt head or top nut to drive it in while bearing down on the bolt head. You can use the leverage of your drill press to push straight while you turn the bolt. A single washer between the bottom nut and the insert can help to flatten any raised surround as you drive the insert in, but if driven in with constant down pressure I get very little raised/torn grain if any.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have tried all of that... Drill press, no drill press, jam nuts, special drivers made specifically for my inserts, nothing has worked. When you guys are done, is there space around the insert? Or are you flush top and around the circumference?
 

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I recently put some inserts in some walnut and my test piece had the same issue.

What I did was to put a screw with 2 nuts (to keep them from moving) into my drill press, use the handle of the drill press to apply enough pressure to keep them from pulling the wood up, and turned the chuck by hand. I did 8 of them without any issues other than a sore hand/forearm from turning the chuck. It probably would have been easier if I had removed the drive belt.
You need one of these:
 

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Old School
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I have tried all of that... Drill press, no drill press, jam nuts, special drivers made specifically for my inserts, nothing has worked. When you guys are done, is there space around the insert? Or are you flush top and around the circumference?
The hole you drill has to be the correct size for the shank of the insert. When they get inserted, there's no gaps at the edges, and they finish flush to the surface.







.
 

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I agree with Cman. Its all in the proper sized hole. If you start with the correct hole size, they go in nice and clean and do not have any issues.

I buy inserts at Lowes, Home Depot, or Ace hardware when I need them and have used this chart for the hole sizes. I've not had any problems and some of the projects have several pounds being supported by the inserts.

http://www.nutty.com/E-Z-Lok-Inserts-for-Wood_c_255.html

Scroll down for the chart.
 

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Wood Snob
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Go with the bolt and double nuts. I use bees wax on them and turn the side with the slot in first. They look better.

Tee nuts only hold in one direction.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 
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