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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,

I had a question about a 12.5" lunchbox planer I recently came into. I've not looked too far into the problem yet but I thought I'd ask here first in case it's a common problem or limitation. It does a pretty good job with lighter stuff but I've noticed when I put heavier planks through, it shaves the last couple of inches of the plank about half a millimetre deeper. Presumably this is where the end of the plank leaves the support of the first feed roller. If I lift the plank as it exits or pull on it lightly it helps but I've not really figured out a way to get it perfect every time which is what I'm after when using a thicknesser!

Anybody know of ways around this? Or is it something wrong with my setup or is it just a limitation...? I can make everything 3 inches longer than I want it to be finished but I kind of thought I was moving away from that sort of carry on when I started buying machinery! I've got a pair of brand new knives to put in it when I get around to it but don't imagine this will eliminate the problem.

Any ideas/advice much appreciated!
Thanks
Josh
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I should have done more reading before posting, huge apologies. So this is called planer snipe..? The planer has a head locking lever on the side of it which I haven't been using, I'm guessing this will help quite a bit?
 

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When the board is completely in the planer it has a infeed and outfeed roller holding the board down. If you allow the board to go in on a angle upward it can snipe the first of the board and if you let the board drop after it leaves the infeed roller it will snipe the end of the board. The solution is to raise up on the board going in until it reaches the outfeed roller and raise the board so it doesn't drop going out.
 

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I should have done more reading before posting, huge apologies. So this is called planer snipe..? The planer has a head locking lever on the side of it which I haven't been using, I'm guessing this will help quite a bit?
Yes, this is called "Snipe" and it happens to the best of us :) You have a few options to minimize the effects.

1. Buy a good outfeed system, take the v-table off your planer and use something that will support the entire length of the wood

2. Hold the wood steady when it's nearing the end. If I'm planing a piece long enough I walk around to the other side and hold the end steady while it exits. It's not ideal but if you're in a pinch it works. You run the risk of messing up the flatness of the plane though.

3. Put an equal thickness piece of wood behind the end of the piece as you feed it into the planer. This is similar to using a piece of wood to prevent blowout or tearout. The secondary piece keeps the rollers pressed equally down which will prevent snipe all together.

4. Cut an additional 2 inches at the end of the piece to square off and cut off the snipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Steve and afx,
I've tried lifting with all sorts of pressure and it still snipes the tail of the board. I've never had a problem with the start of the board. I don't think it is the board raising after leaving the roller so much as the WHOLE cutter head dropping as the first roller rolls off the plank and has nothing to press against.

My feeling is locking the cutter head properly like it says you're supposed to (lol) and supporting the board properly will significantly improve results.

If I don't get any success with that I will run rails down the sides of the board when it really matters.

Thanks a bunch for your help sorry I didn't do my research first!
Cheers
Josh
 

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Hi Steve and afx,
I've tried lifting with all sorts of pressure and it still snipes the tail of the board. I've never had a problem with the start of the board. I don't think it is the board raising after leaving the roller so much as the WHOLE cutter head dropping as the first roller rolls off the plank and has nothing to press against.

My feeling is locking the cutter head properly like it says you're supposed to (lol) and supporting the board properly will significantly improve results.

If I don't get any success with that I will run rails down the sides of the board when it really matters.

Thanks a bunch for your help sorry I didn't do my research first!
Cheers
Josh
sounds like you have a ridgid planer, i have one, if you lock the head each time that will get rid of most of the snip, or at least it can be sanded and will look very good and not be any thickness difference, the snip will be if where you can sand
 

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Hi Steve and afx,
I've tried lifting with all sorts of pressure and it still snipes the tail of the board. I've never had a problem with the start of the board. I don't think it is the board raising after leaving the roller so much as the WHOLE cutter head dropping as the first roller rolls off the plank and has nothing to press against.

My feeling is locking the cutter head properly like it says you're supposed to (lol) and supporting the board properly will significantly improve results.

If I don't get any success with that I will run rails down the sides of the board when it really matters.

Thanks a bunch for your help sorry I didn't do my research first!
Cheers
Josh
That sounds like a similar problem I have with my Delta planer. With mine the problem is with the outfeed roller. The tract it rides on is under such tight tolerances it often sticks in the up position. It is suppose to have a spring that pushes the roller down but it lifts up and stays there. I have to open the machine up and remove the mechanism and clean it and it will function correctly again.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Bandsaw question

I've installed new knives in the thing and I started using the locking mechanism for the cutter head. I sheared the pin in the handle after about the 5th go so it was obviously well used. I pulled it apart and scratched my head for about half an hour as to how it works - it flexes the cast frame of the cutter head rather than expands the tube in the centre to clamp it which i thought was odd hence the head scratching - but got it all adjusted right and put a new cotter pin in it. With the tube in the centre adjusted properly it seems to go really well. With boards about 2ft long and 1-4" wide I get no snipe at all, ever. I think it is to do with width that upsets this machine as far as snipe goes. I haven't put the wider boards through it yet but will see how we go.

I have another question while I'm here haha. I have an old bandsaw and the block guides above and below the blades are getting a bit small - do you guys make these out of anything you'd find around your shed or do I need to go and find some box brass and replace it with that? Also when I'm running a board or lets say a sheet of MDF through it with constant pressure, it surges, about twice per second I'm getting a bit of a grumble and a moment where the board feeds through the blade much faster - presumably it either passes through a section of the band with sharper teeth or where they're tracking better or prouder.. I'm pretty sure I have the guides and beam bearing setup right.. Is this a common sign of a blade that's on its way out or fairly standard practice?

Cheers for the help again!
Josh
 
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