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When I decided to buy this Milwaukee tool (PLH 32 XE) I was convinced that I was getting the “top of the art” heavy duty tool. Boy was I WRONG. The drill soon showed its true origin and broke down after a few months. Maybe a long time ago Milwaukee made some good and long lasting tools but now days, when it has been sold to some profit loving Chinese company “TECHTRONIC INDUSTRIES”, they lost their quality for professionalists. It is true that they look nicer… fancier to be precise but when it comes to hard working tools that pay off every penny you paid for they don’t stand a chance compared to Metabo, Festool, Blue Bosch …. When I dissembled my new AEG BS 12 X (12 V cordless drill), because of some strange noise coming from inside, I discovered that it has motor made in China , besides that one of the butteries died after a few months, so what more proof do you want to realize that behind these once famous tool makers now stands no quality, but only one big money hungry machinery. I would advise everyone not to buy neither Milwaukee nor AEG tools (they are the same and bought are owned by tti industries). If you like that fancy looking semi professional tools than don’t waste money on AEG or MILWAUKKEE simply buy Black & Decker tools that are equal in quality but much cheaper than these two previously mentioned “brands”
DON’T BELIVE MY WORDS SEE IT FOR YOUR SELF….http://www.ttigroup.com
 

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It's hard to find tools not made in China these days, and many of those not made in China come from Mexico. TTI also owns Ryobi and Ridgid. Milwaukee is still their top line. I find it hard to believe that B&D drills and Milwaukee are made with the same level of parts. I'm not doubting that you got a bad tool, but it's more likely an isolated case than the norm. Most of the Ryobi and Ridgid tools do what they're intended to do in their respective markets and most Milwaukee owners have kudos for even their newer Milwaukee tools. I'd hate to see folks pass up a great deal on a Milwaukee tool b/c you got a lemon of a drill....there's not a supplier out their without some defects, and there's no one that offers the best example of every tool either. You didn't mention how their service was...did you pursue repairs under warranty? How well a company stands behind their product is an important measure of the company too.

Welcome to the forum...that's quite an intro! :blink:
 

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The Festool Mystique

Festool is extraordinary - superior quality and expensive. For many, the hefty pricetag on a German-made Festool power tool is prohibitive and makes buying one impractical or perhaps impossible. A lot of tradespeople can only buy as good as they can afford to or need to. No shame in that. So, some of us must simply suck it up as we suffer on with our inferior Panasonic, Makita, Bosch, Ridgid, Porter Cable, DeWalt and Milwaukee power tools. ;)
 

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Good point End Grain.

I must say, my 28v Milwaukee cordless lithium ion drill has been really nice with all that power and run time. Much more power than my late 80s vintage Milwaukee 1/2" corded Holeshooter which was made in America.

But one of the batteries has already crapped out. Won't take a charge or even give a fault code. Less than 100 hours of use and less than 20 cycles when it did it.
 

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Who does what in tool manufactruing.
Techtronics
Milwaukee AEG Royobi Stiletto Homelite Hoover Dirt Devil VAX

Black & Decker
B&D DeWalt Porter Cable Delta Kwikset Baldwin Weiser Lock Price Pfister Emhart Tek K2 Commercial Hardware

Walter Meir Holding AG (Switzerland)
WMH Tool Group builds for Craftsman JET Powermatic Performax Wilton

Stanley
Stanley Proto Husky MAC Jensen Tools Bostich FACOM (european) Blackhawk
 

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USA first but just to "defend" the Chinese for a second,they can make high quality products. The problem is that they are being asked to make cheap crap by American companies.
:yes:
 

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USA first but just to "defend" the Chinese for a second,they can make high quality products. The problem is that they are being asked to make cheap crap by American companies.
:yes:
I think you are right there. Most of the tools and other products today are made over seas. The question is are they made to the company standards that make them quality products.
I will buy nothing from Sears and B&D as they are junk. I have had good luck with Milwaukee and Delta products over the last few years.
I have a Stihl chain saw that I've had for 23 years and it still works fine buy the the 14" 190 that I bought from Stihl a couple of years ago I have had problems with. I live up in the mountains and there is alot of logging up here and alot of the loggers are going to Huskvarna and that is what I will probably do for my next saw.
I think that if a company has things made overseas then they need to keep their same quality standards or they will loose money in the long run, because people are getting tired of the junk that companies sell in todays market.
 

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I'm curious about something. IF the build quality of the majority of modern tools is so bad, then how is it that these companies can sell so many of their products? If high quality tools could be built and sold at a price point where the MFG could make a fair profit, wouldn't it make sense that SOMEONE with some business sense would put the money together to build and sell such tools?

I think we've all owned junk, and over the years have learned to recognize the junk from the good stuff. And in all fairness, there are different tools, at different price points, aimed at different customers and their needs. My experience admittedly tends to lean toward the automotive world and I am learning the woodworking as fast as I can. But I can tell you that I would MUCH rather have Blue Point, or Ingersoll Rand pnuematic tools than ANYTHING Campbell Hausfield sells. But CH still sells a snot load of tools through retailers such as Wal Mart. Why? They do the job the people that buy them want them to do. You will not find them in the tool box of the serious professional trying to earn his living. But you WILL find them in many toolboxes of weekend hot rodders, rock, and mud buggy builders taking care of their pride and joy. The craftsmanship of the finished product is no different. Or perhaps with the cheaper tools, from the hobbyist pouring his heart and soul into his creation, better. But that is a factor of the attention to detail spent by the builder him or herself, not of the tool used.

I own Ryobi (The packaging small print calls it Ryobi / Ridgid), Black and Decker (Same company, and internals as DeWalt), Skil (Robert Bosch corp), and Makita wood working power tools. I love each of them for their own strong points, and hate each for their weak points. Yes I COULD have waited longer to get into Ridgid stuff. But let's face facts. Unless I bought duds, as a weekend warrior, I am never going to be likely to wear out my stuff. And that is what the MFGs are banking on.

If you make your living with your power tools, go ahead and put the extra money aside. Just realize that the name brand you are buying, is internally, no different from the cheaper alternatives unless you are buying top of the line stuff.

If you bought a bad tool. It happens. Learn from it. But don't just blanket statement like "This brand is a series of complete duds for all applications." Unless it is 100% true. And yes, there are some brands out there that are so far off base that they are only good as paper weights and dust collectors. If that is the case, say so...
 

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I'll second the Husqvarna chainsaw, it's on my next chainsaw list as well. For tools right now, I'm liking Ridgid, the prices are reasonable and I think the products are well built.
 

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I'm a Husky guy for the most part myself fellas, but you just can't judge an entire product line by one single product. This is my broken-record disertation on . . buy the tool not the color dangit! again.

Both Stihl and Husqvarna are two of the, if not the two best overall chainsaw manufacturers on the planet. They both have models that outperform the others' models in each respective classes. I say that knowing that Dolmar and a couple other manufacturers also make fine saws.

Both Husky and Stihl do things I like and don't like, and have certain models I like and don't like. To make a flat statement that Stihls are no longer any good is real, well, highly inaccurate.
Not trying to get off into a chainsaw discussion here - the OP also made a faux pas IMO. The fact that Milwaukee sold out did not automatically render every one of their products cheap junk suddenly. I don't like seeing our manufacturing base going overseas either but it is, and has, and will continue to do so so long as we continue to elect officials into office like we have been doing. Never mind. Didn't mean sniff that pile of maggots.

Point is, you guys keep talking about how great one brand is or how bad one brand is, and I am guilty of it too at times (i.e. "I don't like Craftsman power tools"), but the fact is, nearly every company makes a good tool or more somewhere in it's product line, and nearly every company makes a bad one or more.

If you are only going to buy products from one company based on not having a bad experience with a tool you're soon going to have to quit buying tools because even your favorite brand whether it be Yellow, Blue, Green, Red, Black, or Rainbow - they all make a good one and they all make a POJ.

My shop and tool trailer and tool lockers all look like a minature Home Depot and Amazon.com warehouse. I own practically every brand made and I have made almost all my purchases because I researched the actual tool that represented the features and performance I was looking for and not the color of the tool itself.

I am not saying the way I buy a tool makes me right or anything. I just think it gives me the freedom to choose the best overall tool in each respective category than a guy who thinks DeWalt or Milwaukee or Bosch or Acme makes the best of everything. It just ain't true. No single company can tout the best tool in every class.

If you are on of those who says "I can't afford the best tool I am a weekend warrior" this rule still applies. The "best" tool is the one that is best for your needs and that often means the "best value". Let's say you need to cut out some Christmas outlines for your front lawn to make your wife happy this coming Christmas. You don't need precision and performance and reliabilty. You need cheap and "good enough". That could mean one of those $39 Craftsman jigsaws I would tell you is junk, instead of a $139 Bosch Barrel Grip design I say is the best. In this case I would be wrong to say the Craftsman isn't any good because in your case the POJ Craftsman is easily the "best" tool for your need.

In the next issue: Features to Consider In Your Next Pet Rock :huh:
 

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True Texas Timbers, it's a habit to talk in generalities though. Milwaukee used to have a good sawzall, Skil worm drive circular saws are the best imo, I could go down a list but that's an awful lot of typing, it's easier to just say "Ridgid makes a good tool" :D
 

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. . it's easier to just say "Ridgid makes a good tool" :D
Yeah I bet they do. I don't think I own any Ridgid but I will check in a minute. I'm about to go back into the tool trailer for a screw gun. Alot of the tools we call junk today are still marvels of modern technology. And on the other hand many of the best power tools cannot give the satisfaction, and in some cases the precision, of a good sharp hand plane, chisel, or backsaw.
 

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Texas Timbers. I think you rephrased what I was trying to get at. I think another way to say it is. The best tool, is the tool that fits your needs in the areas of performance, durability, compatibility, and affordability best. In my case I cannot justify a $600.00 Ridgid Table Saw, and would never wear one out. Bit I have friends that swear that all Ryobi table saws are junk, and all Delta saws are gold plated. He then proceeds to cross cut midways full sheets of Hardi Panel on his Delta benchtop table saw and burns two of them up. (With no infeed or outfeed support either so you KNOW he is binding those blades up!) On the other hand. The way I use my table saw, I will likely never wear my Ryobi out. It is a strong saw, and has so far done everything I have asked of it.
 

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have a Stihl chain saw that I've had for 23 years and it still works fine buy the the 14" 190 that I bought from Stihl a couple of years ago
You are aware that Stihl make both a consumer and a pro line.
Sounds like you bought consumer grade.

Check out their web site, they list some saws for occasional use and some saws for professional use. It wasn't always this way. They used to make only pro saws. A lot of people didn't/don't want to pay the higher prices for pro saws.
 

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Putnam I fell for that bug trick! :laughing: That's downright mean! :laughing:


I was wrong about not having any Ridgid tools I just bought a 16 ga brad nailer about two weeks ago. I couldn't shoot any 16 ga. longer tha 2" so I got the Ridgid 16ga at big orange - it shoots up to a 2 1/2" inch brad. So far I love it although I have only shot about 100 brads ........
 

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I have the Ridgid 18ga brad nailer and it's working great. Oilless, powerful, light and so far, jam-free. Appears very well made with good ergonomics and a few nice extras. And, at $99 from HD, it was IMO a much better buy than the new and less expensive Porter Cable version from China. Talk about flimsy and spartan. That new PC nailer does not do any justice to the PC name or its heritage.
 
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