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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm planning to start building a table for my department and I realized I know nothing about joining wood. So, I looked for a design I would like to copy and when I took a closer look to the joints I noticed I don't have a clue about how to do that. basically it's about joining 2 long pieces of wood cut in 45º all the way long. I attached a terrible picture of the table joints (I did not find a good one) so you can see what I'm taking about.

how to do that? does it have a particular name??

thanks a lot!

Frank
 

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bzguy
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That picture looks like a factory made piece, laminate (formica) or melamine with mitered laminate or PVC edge-banding?
Hard to say from that picture but the grain on the top doesn't look like it's the same piece of solid wood as the edge which would be end grain.
The grain on a table top (with drawers) normally runs side to side, this appears to be front to back?
 

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It's just a mitered edge joint, they can be tricky. Maybe you can just use a rabbeted joint instead, depending on the design.
 

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More basic than your question, what tools and equipment do you have? How you join wood would largely depend on the tools you have. The photo appears to be maple wood that has been mitered on a table saw and glued together. If you are just getting into woodworking the first step would be for you to acquire a table saw. I would get at least a contractor size saw, not one of these table top models.
 

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What kind of department is it for which you will be building the table? Will the department budget allow for the purchase of tools? Will this table be used where it is visible to the public? Do they have a budget for you to go to wood working classes before starting the project?

Many, many questions.

George
 

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bzguy
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Still looks fishy to me, edge doesn't look like end grain and it's an unorthodox way to make a table.
Looks "Chinese factory" to me, there are easier and stronger ways to build your first table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks everyone for you replies!! Your suggestions have been very useful for me. About the table, it was made by a local wood workshop (I live in Chile) and it has a very interesting design (although it will not be easy to make). I'll upload a picture of the table. About the department, I was talking about my flat (sorry if i was not clear with that, sorry for my english), and I have a room where I can put the tools. About the equipment... I don't have much really, I'm planning to buy a table saw and a few more things. Working on this table is just an excuse to start working wood.

thank you all! and I'm really opened hear some advise from you before I start with this!

Frank
 

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bzguy
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Now that's a picture, it is real wood.
Nice design, difficult build.
If you want to make that you're going to need some equipment.
To make that with the drawer the way it is, you'll need a planer, router, clamps, table saw, sander, sprayer of some sort for starters.
If you modify it it so the drawer and dividers are 3/4" thick you can buy dimensioned lumber and skip the planer.
 

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The New Guy
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Ignoring that it may or may not be solid wood and other things that don't really matter, the joint that you're referring to is just two pieces of wood, cut at a 45 degree angle and glued together. You can get a 45 degree cut on a table saw, or with router bits. Personally, I'd use a router bit because my 30 year old HF table saw has a bad bearing and wobbles which produces a poor cut. If you have a decent table saw, that would be easier in my opinion.

What kind of table are you talking about making? One like in the picture, or a dining table?
 

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bzguy
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The difficulty in this build is getting the inside and outside box to fit perfectly because they did it with no metal drawer slides.
It is made with solid wood, which would have to be very dry and stay very dry in order for the drawer to slide smoothly.
Even with plywood and edge-banding this has to fit perfect or be modified with mechanical slides, etc.
 

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where's my table saw?
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here's what I see...

2 identical open ended boxes, and a sliding drawer that connects them. Pretty simple actually. The boxes can be on casters and the drawer slides made of hardwood or UHM plastic, or aluminum track.
They need not be "ultra precise" for the boxes to slide on the rails, just a nice slip fit.
The boxes can be made with miters, rabbets or butted depending on the look you want. A butted joint will leave an exposed edge, a miter joint will conceal both edges and a rabbet will show a narrow edge.

You can use solid wood glued into flat panels, plastic laminate over a particle board or plywood or just plywood with a thin strip capping the exposed edge.

You will need a table saw at minimum to bevel the edges for the miter joints or to cut the panels precisely and square for rabbets or butt joints. The back can be recessed in a rabbet. The drawer can be plywood or hardwood on the sides and plywood in the bottom.

A good sketch showing the construction details, dimensions and sizes will be very helpful. :yes:
 

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bzguy
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2 identical open ended boxes, and a sliding drawer that connects them. Pretty simple actually.

I agree, the "idea" is simple, but precision is absolutely essential.
For a guy to go out and buy equipment he's never used and actually miter this accurately together and get the thing to work is entirely another matter.
 

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where's my table saw?
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precision miter are difficult for sure

That's why I suggested rabbets or butt joints. If edge banding is used it can "appear" to be mitered even if the joint itself is a lap, rabbet or butt. :smile:
 

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bzguy
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I am all for helping people on this forum, but a totally inexperienced person is going to have a very rough time making this piece with any techniques.
This guy is just considering buying his first table saw.
I know I couldn't make and then put a finish on this before I had a few years of experience.
 

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Old School
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That's why I suggested rabbets or butt joints. If edge banding is used it can "appear" to be mitered even if the joint itself is a lap, rabbet or butt. :smile:
How do you make a joint 'appear' mitered with a rabbet or butt, using edge banding?

How would a 90 degree corner as pictured be done with a 'lap'?






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Old School
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Bump

That's why I suggested rabbets or butt joints. If edge banding is used it can "appear" to be mitered even if the joint itself is a lap, rabbet or butt. :smile:
How do you make a joint 'appear' mitered with a rabbet or butt, using edge banding?

How would a 90 degree corner as pictured be done with a 'lap'?






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Unless I'm missing something the edge banding would be mitered to extend over or "lap" the rabbet or butt joint and appear as a mitered joint.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Yup

Unless I'm missing something the edge banding would be mitered to extend over or "lap" the rabbet or butt joint and "appear" as a mitered joint.
Quotation marks added by edit.....

The miter would appear on the front edge, not on the side. The side would have an exposed thin edge. A lock rabbet could be used. All I'm saying is there are other ways to build the boxes to avoid a "precision" bevel cut. Will it look identical to the photo, No, but it won't be as difficult to make. The issue as I understand it, is to be able to make or build the boxes with a minimum of skills, tools and or machinery.... which otherwise would be required to make perfect long edge 45 degree bevels. :yes:

 
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Old School
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Nope

Quotation marks added by edit.....

The miter would appear on the front edge, not on the side. The side would have an exposed thin edge. A lock rabbet could be used. All I'm saying is there are other ways to build the boxes to avoid a "precision" bevel cut. Will it look identical to the photo, No, but it won't be as difficult to make. The issue as I understand it, is to be able to make or build the boxes with a minimum of skills, tools and or machinery.... which otherwise would be required to make perfect long edge 45 degree bevels. :yes:

What you are describing doesn't answer the OP's question. The question is what joinery would be used to create the look in the posted picture. That means to the long edges. You could say that "lapping" the ends to look like a miter, but that's not what you said. Your words were...If edge banding is used it can "appear" to be mitered even if the joint itself is a lap, rabbet or butt.

You stated lap/rabbet/butt joints as choices. For a 90 degree corner, "a "lap" joint is an incorrect guess. A butt or a rabbet could be used, but would not give the long edge the look the OP wants for the long edge and the ends. So, why suggest it? A 45 miter would be the choice to provide both areas the look he wants., A lock miter (if done perfectly) would take care of the long edge, and the ends could be edged, to appear as a miter.

What we are suggesting is a method that can be done simply with minimum tools. There is a way to do the long edges using a blind spline rabbet, to give a clean look to the long edges. The ends can be edged.
Line Diagram Parallel






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