Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I needed to mill a piece of 0.75" hard maple down to 0.375" for a domino set I was making.
I set my DeWalt planer to cut very shallow cuts, no more than 0.03125" (1/32") per pass. I also used
a piece of scrap pine to follow the maple board through the planer to help minimize snipe. Turned on the planer and
started to send the pieces through. I heard the knives starting to cut the maple and I was just about to
take my hands away when suddenly the maple kicked back hard into the pine scrap and into my left
hand hitting my left ring finger very hard causing a small cut that bled profusely. I wasn't concerned about the cut,
I was concerned that I couldn't move my finger and had no feeling from the first knuckle to the tip.
A trip to our local urgent care confirmed that the phalanx of my ring finger had been fractured and crushed.
I am now waiting to see an orthopedist to see if I'll need surgery.

I've sent hundreds of BF through my planer without any problem.
The maple board was clear and free of any imperfections so I can't understand why this happened.

I have been a wood worker since I first took woodshop in 7th grade, and besides the occasional cuts and splinters,
I have never had a major injury until now. I pride myself on safety and never take chances or shortcuts that could
injure me.

I guess it was just my turn...
 

·
Smart and Cool
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
Yesterday I needed to mill a piece of 0.75" hard maple down to 0.375" for a domino set I was making.
I set my DeWalt planer to cut very shallow cuts, no more than 0.03125" (1/32") per pass. I also used
a piece of scrap pine to follow the maple board through the planer to help minimize snipe. Turned on the planer and
started to send the pieces through. I heard the knives starting to cut the maple and I was just about to
take my hands away when suddenly the maple kicked back hard into the pine scrap and into my left
hand hitting my left ring finger very hard causing a small cut that bled profusely. I wasn't concerned about the cut,
I was concerned that I couldn't move my finger and had no feeling from the first knuckle to the tip.
A trip to our local urgent care confirmed that the phalanx of my ring finger had been fractured and crushed.
I am now waiting to see an orthopedist to see if I'll need surgery.

I've sent hundreds of BF through my planer without any problem.
The maple board was clear and free of any imperfections so I can't understand why this happened.

I have been a wood worker since I first took woodshop in 7th grade, and besides the occasional cuts and splinters,
I have never had a major injury until now. I pride myself on safety and never take chances or shortcuts that could
injure me.

I guess it was just my turn...
Sounds like the leading edge of the board lifted somehow, or was curled up. Other possibilities are dirty or worn feed roller, or an issue with feed roller tension springs.

Hope you recover from the injury.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like the leading edge of the board lifted somehow, or was curled up. Other possibilities are dirty or worn feed roller, or an issue with feed roller tension springs.

Hope you recover from the injury.
When my paw heals I will look at everything you suggested.
Thanks!
 

·
Smart and Cool
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
When my paw heals I will look at everything you suggested.
Thanks!
I know it is a bit out of scope, but this is another reason I like the Shelix style cutter heads. Not 100% that it would have not happened with one, but much less chance when there isn't a single(one of 3) blade hitting the wood for the cut. The inserts on the Shelix are about 1" each and only one at a time will be contacting that leading edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know it is a bit out of scope, but this is another reason I like the Shelix style cutter heads. Not 100% that it would have not happened with one, but much less chance when there isn't a single(one of 3) blade hitting the wood for the cut. The inserts on the Shelix are about 1" each and only one at a time will be contacting that leading edge.
Good point. A Shelix cutter head has been on my wish list for a while, I think now it'll get a bit more priority.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
29,176 Posts
Still, it should not have happened! For straight blade planers, I recommend sending the work through at an angle. this does two things. It equalizes the wear across the entire blade width and it allows a smaller area of initial contact with the first cut. Just develop this habit, whether it would have prevented your kickback .... who knows?
Another tip is not to push with a stiff finger, hand or wrist. Use a squeeze grip, so if the piece comes back, it will slide between your fingers harmlessly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NoThankyou and AJ.

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Ouch! I hope you recover quickly and well.

When you have a chance maybe post a photo of the maple, maybe it'll be a clue for what happened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I'm sorry this happened!
On a positive note: that's the push I needed to order MicroJig pusher block thingies.

I was also going to order the "10 Million Dollar Stick" yet it's out of stock at the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I personally would buy a butchers glove made out of fine chain.
Will protect against cuts etc. Available from Amazon.
johnep
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,228 Posts
How long was your wood? If it was too short it can and most times will kick back. The feed roller will push down on the rear of the board and raise the front of the board making it come in really heavy against the cutters. There goes a nasty kick back, big time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I personally would buy a butchers glove made out of fine chain.
Will protect against cuts etc. Available from Amazon.
johnep
This seems like a good idea, yet I wonder how much 'feel' one would loose by having that metal between one and the workpiece.

Interesting.
 

·
Registered
Termite
Joined
·
4,553 Posts
Gloves are for gardening not woodworking or around any machinery for that matter.
Alot of people wear them . At one time I considered fingerless gloves to help with warmth I the winter in shops,but I couldn't get use to them...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,450 Posts
Gloves are for gardening not woodworking or around any machinery for that matter.
I keep supple leather work gloves in the shop. I wear them mostly for installing and removing bandsaw blades. I wear them when gripping and moving large heavy boards to avoid splinters. I wear them when installing or removing router bits. Sometimes I wear them when handling table saw blades, especially dado stacks.

I wear disposable gloves when I am handling chemicals or finishes.

I don't wear gloves when operating power tools, which is what I think @FrankC meant in his statement.
 

·
Newbie but oldie
Joined
·
50 Posts
Yesterday I needed to mill a piece of 0.75" hard maple down to 0.375" for a domino set I was making.
I set my DeWalt planer to cut very shallow cuts, no more than 0.03125" (1/32") per pass. I also used
a piece of scrap pine to follow the maple board through the planer to help minimize snipe. Turned on the planer and
started to send the pieces through. I heard the knives starting to cut the maple and I was just about to
take my hands away when suddenly the maple kicked back hard into the pine scrap and into my left
hand hitting my left ring finger very hard causing a small cut that bled profusely. I wasn't concerned about the cut,
I was concerned that I couldn't move my finger and had no feeling from the first knuckle to the tip.
A trip to our local urgent care confirmed that the phalanx of my ring finger had been fractured and crushed.
I am now waiting to see an orthopedist to see if I'll need surgery.

I've sent hundreds of BF through my planer without any problem.
The maple board was clear and free of any imperfections so I can't understand why this happened.

I have been a wood worker since I first took woodshop in 7th grade, and besides the occasional cuts and splinters,
I have never had a major injury until now. I pride myself on safety and never take chances or shortcuts that could
injure me.

I guess it was just my turn...
You will fine!!! Keep thinking positive and smelling the fresh cut pine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
From your post I cannot tell if you were attempting to plane the board down by itself (with the snipe chaser) or if you used a planer sled.

When I get down to below 3/4” thickness, I will use a sled to support and raise up the workpiece so there is better contact with the rollers and less snipe, plus my sled has a ledger strip at the back end that would have prevented your kickback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@ppd417 how is your finger? I guess by now you've had surgery and there is a pin in it?
Surprisingly, the ortho didn't want to do surgery....yet. He aligned the bones (that was fun...) and applied a heavy duty splint. I go back to see him
in a week. If it's not healing correctly, then surgery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
From your post I cannot tell if you were attempting to plane the board down by itself (with the snipe chaser) or if you used a planer sled.

When I get down to below 3/4” thickness, I will use a sled to support and raise up the workpiece so there is better contact with the rollers and less snipe, plus my sled has a ledger strip at the back end that would have prevented your kickback.
Was planning the board by itself with a snipe chaser.
I think now I'll make a sled.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top