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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hi, new to the site and a bit of a novice at woodworking. Built a few furniture pieces here and there.

Im here today with a few questions if anyone cares to give me there thoughts.

Im soon to be building this Edge Bed. Pretty simple design. Info i know about it is its made from some reclaimed brazilian wood and mahagony veneer on the end grain.

Ill prob make it from pine and pretty comfortable in the finishing to give it that worn old look.

Building it and joinery suggestions?
and material... should i go with 1x12 or 2x12 lumber?

thanks for any help and suggestions you may have.
 

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Why not look for reclaimed wood so that you don't have to worry about trying to finish it to look like that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome...

OK lets say i have the reclaimed wood i need to build it.. Im back at my original post for suggestions and ideas....
 

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I would use 3/4" material for all the cabinet work, which will be the sides, foot, and headboard boxes and the drawers. You could use 2 x material for a platform under the matress to support a plywood deck.

If you can't find weathered wood, you can sandblast it or use a torch on it, if it is pine, and use 3-M scotchbright pads to buff off the ashes. I did this for several years on a line of rustic furniture that I built. I used an acetylene cutting torch with the oxygen lever engaged, making passes over the wood, as if spray painting with flame. Once the pieces have been torched and buffed with the pads, lacquer is sprayed on. The result is amazing...a weathered look and a warm brown color. If you buff the wood more, the dark color comes off and leaves a deep weathered surface. Here is an album from my Shutterfly site to show you examples of what this looks like. Click the forward arrow to see all the items.

https://mnsawyerswoodworkingandartworks.shutterfly.com/pictures/38
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you.
Nice work you have there.

ok lets say i use 1x12 to build the boxes how would you join the 1x12s together to make it look like one large timber. just cant picture if butt joints would kind of dissappear with all the distress the wood would have.

i tend to over build and over think everything.. so getting yalls opinions and thoughts will help

thank u!
 

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You could cut 45 degree end cuts on your box pieces so no end grain shows. I don't think that is necessary. You will need to make a face frame for the front of each drawer box so the ends of those boxes will have a verticle board (called a stile). This would cap off the end grain of the sides of the drawer cabinets. You can run a decorative router bit profile on that corner, such as a round over or ogee.

If you do use my method of torching the wood, then the end grain becomes quite interesting and not bad to look at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank u sir.

Yea i was thinking either 45, butt them, or rabbet them length wise and a slight round over. ive been leaning towards rabbeting the length and round over lately. Your help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Rabbets are a good way to go. They make strong joints, and if done accurately, will make precise boxes. Just realize that if your router or dado cuts are off even 1/32", measurements of your cabinet sizes start crawling and when you get to final assembly, you can have problems. Drawer fits really become critical when using rabbet joints.
 

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As a novice woodworker it might be helpful for you to sign on to the internet site for Fine Woodworking. It's reasonably priced for an annual subscription. I have it and refer to it often for tips, techniques, and their how to videos. They have sections on joinery and project designs including beds. Just a thought.

Good luck.
 
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