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Discussion Starter #1
My wife has decided that I should make a bed. She picked this one but with solid panels instead of slats. I was also told to use solid wood instead of plywood.
 

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Selected some oak. Looks like i will have enough except for the side rails, everything I had was too short.. Had to do some laminations for the posts even if they are not that big.
 

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One frame completed. Had to redo the headboard legs as someone marked the spacing between the mortises using the foot board legs. Welcome to the golden age.
 

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These will be joined to make the footboard panel. I tried to explain to my wife that I should use plywood but to no avail. The allowance for movement should be from side to side right? Please forgive the foggy photo.
 

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It would be a monumental mistake to put a solid wood panel in the headboard and footboard especially if you glue it in. In the next 20 years the wood will shrink from 1/8" to 1/4". A large panel like that never just shrinks evenly even if it's just floating in a dado, it splits open. The finish you put on the wood ends up gluing it in to a certain extent. Then if you mortise the end pieces to accept the panel when it shrinks there would be a white line where the wood wasn't stained. Plywood was advised for a very good reason. If you just have to use solid wood it would hold up better to run the grain horizontal. By doing that the panel has only 2' of width to contend with. The shrinkage would be less.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I showed this to my wife. She still doesn't want plywood. So I'll have to think of something.
 

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if the same fabrication methods are used for large horizontal table tops,
why won't it work for a vertical project of the same nature ?
(just thinking out loud here).

.
 

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We have an "antique" bed from the 1930s, probably made in Belgium. It has two large solid wood panels on the headboard and footboard. One of the panels has a split in the headboard. It split a long time ago, in exactly the way that @Steve Neul described.

Photos:
* Footboard
* Headboard
* Closeup of Split in Headboard
 

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if the same fabrication methods are used for large horizontal table tops,
why won't it work for a vertical project of the same nature ?
(just thinking out loud here).

.
I talked to a company one time about making tables. First thing they mentioned is all would must be accimated and stabilized for one year prior to assembly...Takes money to make money... I was out....

I also went inside a table and chair manufacturing plant off I-35 in Kansas City. We went in the side to buy some pedistal for a furniture company I worked for in the early 90's. There was stacks of chars and tables with flaws sols once a year as defective units. Not everything is perfect in a productive world...
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
You are makimg one large panel?

Wise to break the panal up..This beds 20 years old and built like a tank...
Steve, please describe how yours is made up. Are they 4 separate panels? Are the moldings over a joint? Are they linked with biscuits, tongue & groove or any other way?

Maybe I should point out that this oak is from church pews that sat there for 60 years or so and have been in my shop for a little over 10 years afterwards.

Thanks, Pat
 

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The bed is made cabinet style. I was a cabinet maker at the the time and thought like a cabinet maker. Later I became a furniture maker and did things differently.

Panels were broke up because that's the way doors are done. Very wide panels create shrinkage.

If you want a wide panel. I would suggest a trim piece that will allow you ad the panel finished and then trimmed in.

Otherwise I would completely stain and atleast seal coat the panel before assembly..

If you've ever clamped a panel up andd left it in a clamp you may have noticed your clamps getting loose. This is panel movement....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The bed is made cabinet style. I was a cabinet maker at the the time and thought like a cabinet maker. Later I became a furniture maker and did things differently.

Panels were broke up because that's the way doors are done. Very wide panels create shrinkage.

If you want a wide panel. I would suggest a trim piece that will allow you ad the panel finished and then trimmed in.

Otherwise I would completely stain and atleast seal coat the panel before assembly..

If you've ever clamped a panel up andd left it in a clamp you may have noticed your clamps getting loose. This is panel movement....
That is likely what I will do.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here's the footboard. each panel is roughly 12 inches square. I have the following options:
-Install them loose in the groove, butt ended against the post (with or without biscuits).
-Glue them all together (with or without biscuits), butt ended against the post.
-Either one grooved into the post.
 

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