Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a little cubby in the center of a hallway, about 2 x 2 1/2 ft square with a couple of shelves in it. I am thinking about framing it in and putting a couple of cabinet doors on it. I'm thinking full overlay hinges and, as the framing won't intrude on the present opening, frameless hinges. For an opening that size I will be building two doors with 0 center clearance as there will be no center stile. For purposes of figuring rail length and panel width, should I use 3/4" for the hinge side overlays? Some hinges will give a dimension but many just say "full" or "partial":blink:
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
It would depend if your cabinet end is frameless (either 3/4" or 5/8"), or it has a face frame (one that protrudes into the cabinet. Hinge setups for frameless are figured in full/partial/inset, while faceframed setups are figured in inches of overlay.

If you have a 3/4" end, you can use a full overlay hinge and a zero plate (minimum thickness). With the left and right adjustment you can set the door over as far as 3/4", allowing it to be flush with the outside of the cabinet.

With that same hinge, you can achieve a partial or inset configuration by just using a different thickness plate (which just sets the door further from the edge of the cabinet).






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,984 Posts
I wouldn't figure 3/4" for the overlay on full overlay hinges. They will adjust out that much but it's at the limit of how much they will adjust. You will need some wiggle room for adjusting them with the opening. I would use 11/16" overlay to determine door size.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi guys, thanks for the responses.
Actually, it isn't a cabinet, it is just basically a square hole in the wall that goes back about 3 feet. My thought was to just frame around it with 1x2 stock, flush with the opening and treat it like a frameless cabinet with respect to doors and hinges. I was trying to determine what the overlay of a full overlay hinge is to compute the rail length/panel size so the door size comes out to a 0 clearance between the two doors within the adjustment latitude of the hinges.
The actual overlay isn't of much consequence, Steves' suggestion of using 11/16" for computing purposes sounds good. My concern is getting the doors built and ending up with a large gap or interference fit between them.
Thanks:smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,984 Posts
Hi guys, thanks for the responses.
Actually, it isn't a cabinet, it is just basically a square hole in the wall that goes back about 3 feet. My thought was to just frame around it with 1x2 stock, flush with the opening and treat it like a frameless cabinet with respect to doors and hinges. I was trying to determine what the overlay of a full overlay hinge is to compute the rail length/panel size so the door size comes out to a 0 clearance between the two doors within the adjustment latitude of the hinges.
The actual overlay isn't of much consequence, Steves' suggestion of using 11/16" for computing purposes sounds good. My concern is getting the doors built and ending up with a large gap or interference fit between them.
Thanks:smile:
I normally leave 1/8" gap between doors like that. Wood swells and if you plan them to almost touch if they swell any then you have to start adjusting the doors out. In my case it's a customers door and they don't adjust them themselves, they call me and it's usually a 40 to 50 mile trip to do 5 minutes door adjusting.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Hi guys, thanks for the responses.
Actually, it isn't a cabinet, it is just basically a square hole in the wall that goes back about 3 feet. My thought was to just frame around it with 1x2 stock, flush with the opening and treat it like a frameless cabinet with respect to doors and hinges. I was trying to determine what the overlay of a full overlay hinge is to compute the rail length/panel size so the door size comes out to a 0 clearance between the two doors within the adjustment latitude of the hinges.
The actual overlay isn't of much consequence, Steves' suggestion of using 11/16" for computing purposes sounds good. My concern is getting the doors built and ending up with a large gap or interference fit between them.
Thanks:smile:
You may find that the vertical edges of the opening fall into one or more conditions. They may not be parallel. They may not be flat. So, your adding a ¾" "frame" would have to be shimmed to stay straight (vertically). If you want the doors to be flush, or close to it, the "frame" would have to be set back. If you make the "frame" flush with the front edge (which may not be plumb), the doors will sit forward of the walls.

In any case, for your door width measurement, you will likely benefit to find the narrowest point, and use that to figure. You could create what would be a visually good looking and plumb opening by installing the "frame", and caulk any gaps to the wall. Then overlay the door and allow enough reveal to the wall, so if it varies, it won't be noticeable.






.
 

·
John
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Steve - Yeah, I plan for 0 but generally leave something under an 1/8". I did the kitchen cabinets that way last year and so far it's worked out. Those were face framed though and I used the Liberty 5/8" overlay hinges.

cman - yeah, if I ever find anything in this place square and/or parallel I'll likely go into cardiac arrest. The "frame" will be built in the shop and modified/shimmed/planed or whatever it takes to be true in all axis; left-right/top-bottom/in-out.
I think I have a plan, but then I remember that General Custer also had a plan:eek:
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top