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Discussion Starter #1
I need and answer please? I'm trying to finish coffee table the top. I had a lot of tearout from useing a hand plane instead of the elec. one. It went from the saw mill to me. I just finished a video explaining proper plane technique, and sharpening. My planes are all sharpened strait accross. That didn't help the situation. They are not supposed to be. I hit it with a belt sander first, then a random orbit . I just got done sanding both sides 50-60-100-150 grit. I thought I got all the tearout. I didn't. How noticeable will this tearout be? I'm just using tung oil and wax. Should I start over and get it all or just finish it? If I do sand out the tearout I'm assuming I'll have dips so I will need to do the whole serface.
 

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I believe the tearout will be worse once you throw a finish on it. Rub it down with some mineral sprits and it will let you know what it will look like.
I would see if a local cabinet shop would run it through a thickness sander a few times. Shouldn't cost all that much.
 

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That is the "problem" with figured and spalted wood, tearout. I really can't see it in the picture. How deep is it ? On a side note but still pertinent, to make the figure show I would sand to 400 (some may disagree, let them) that is just my experience. So I would say you have more sanding to do anyway, if it is not too deep you will get it out then. You are not going to have a super high gloss finish with oil/wax so little imperfections like a spot you have to sand more and feather out are not going to show (or even a little tearout spot, that wood is going to get dented eventually anyway...its a table).
 

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Just a few ideas for you. If the surface is that bad, get is surface sanded as suggested. Try less blade exposure. I usually start with no exposure, and gradually lower it until slight contact is made. Your blade may not be as sharp as you think. You might try planing in the other direction (still with the grain). Grain lays wildly, and you'll find one direction may be better than another. Use only slight pressure, enough just to keep the base flat.

Set the plane at a skew angle, instead of straight on. Your shavings should be paper thin. Your starter strokes may be hitting just high spots, and when you get near flat, you'll hear the most beautiful whizzing sound (that's the best word I could think of at this hour). BTW, I sharpen straight across and get excellent results. You can see where you start and where it's high before the next pass.






 

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Discussion Starter #5
A sanding I will go. I was looking at a Jet thickness sander today. I don't see one in my near future, unless I get a deal on a used one. I met guy from ebay I buy wood from, he has a real nice sander. I've been to his house twice. He want's me to do some electric work for him in a few weeks. I don't know if I should ask him or not. I'll get it done one way or another. I just didn't want to waist my time only to find out you wouldn't see it anyway. I scored some nice stuff from a guy in Amish country today. He had just bought out the shop of a old timer that had to to a home. There was some beutiful stuff.
 

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I posted almost the exact same time as you cabnetman. I'm not going near that top with a plane. It's about 1/4" thinner from sanding out gouges let alone tearout. I was playing with a piece of poplar the other day. I'll learn on that. So you don't think I need to change me blades. I have 3# 5s. I'll experiment with them. Thanks
 

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cabnetman, have you seen the DVD called Coarse,Medium, Fine. I got it from Lie Nelson. A guy named Christopher Schwarz explains the differences between the planes, and how to use them. Very informative. I learned a lot. I'm looking forward to trying out what he explained. Thanks for your input, sorry for the misunderstanding.
 

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I grew a set and got out the belt sander. I got one side real good. I figuredthe bottom didn't have to be perfect. Here's one coat of tung oil on the bottom side.
 

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I think that with the finish your going to apply, you'll want it a smooth as possible to begin with. Any imperfections will be magnified from my experience.

I would go after it with a belt sander again then the random orbit sander. If you make sure you keep the Belt sander moving and go over the whole thing evenly you shouldn't get dips, in theory, but you know that, and we all know how theory works.

It looks like it will be a great looking top when your done.
 

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Your saying literaly pour it on. I'll get runs on the edges.
No figuratively. Dave B called it "you'll want it a smooth as possible to begin with."

My little tidbit of advice earlier "On a side note but still pertinent, to make the figure show I would sand to 400"

I just meant, get after it. And you must not be using pure Tung oil, but a "Tung oil finish"...can't help too much there.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Daren you just told me Tung oil. I didn't know there was tung oil and tung oil finish. I just looked, it is tung oil finish. It's on there heavy. After getting the bad spots out with the belt sander, I did 2 to 4 passes each with 50-60-100-120-150-220-320-400. that sucker is smooth as glass. I know I could have skipped a few grits, but I figured in case I missed something I'd have batter chance of getting it with so many sanding's. I'm in between coats, it feels a little rough. That will buff out with the wax, I guess?
 

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Yea. I guess I could have been more clear. Just tung oil, I use this stuff http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=6230 (that link may die, it's on closeout...cheap too).It's called Chinawood deck oil it is tung oil in a petroleum base that evaporates.

Then a wax. I prefer this stuff (don't let the small can fool you...a little goes a LONG way). http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?Offerings_ID=17424 Others may have suggestions too. That is just what I had good luck with.
But neither one of them build up, so that is why I sand so fine. I am finishing the wood, not the finish.
 
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