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Hi Everybody there!

I'm a new to wood finishing trends! I am trying to reclaim Teak Wood from left over pieces which are generally non uniform in color (white to yellowish brown mixture of colors since origin is not controlled single source).

Could you plz advise me how to achieve uniform Teak like color across all pieces. Kindly suggest me coloring material & procedure that could be useful for coloring no of small pieces in quantities, batchwise.

regards,

Bhavesh
 

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I think your best bet would be to go ahead and stain the entire project slightly lighter than the end result you want. Then with toners or an aniline dye shade with a sprayer the lighter areas. Then apply a thin coat of aniline dye over the entire project to bring the color up to the end result you want. It would then be ready to seal and topcoat. Be sure to test the formula on scrap wood first before you put anything on your project.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Steve..

Appreciate your immediate feedback.

Indeed you've suggested me a wonderful point of keeping tone lighter than that desiered in final project which could be altered during finishing.

I was thinking of treating wood with Pot Permangnate Solution which ultimately gives shades of brown.

Will it work?? What do you suggest??

regards,

Bhavesh
 

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Hi Everybody there!

I'm a new to wood finishing trends! I am trying to reclaim Teak Wood from left over pieces which are generally non uniform in color (white to yellowish brown mixture of colors since origin is not controlled single source).

Could you plz advise me how to achieve uniform Teak like color across all pieces. Kindly suggest me coloring material & procedure that could be useful for coloring no of small pieces in quantities, batchwise.

regards, Bhavesh
No matter what kind of stain or dye you use, when applying to a piece that has both light and dark on it, the dark will get darker. You will have to experiment with using a colorant on the light part without getting it on the dark part.

In your testing of available colorants, you could start with a waterbase stain, as it can be thinned down, and dries very fast. You can incrementally add more color to get a closer match. Oil base stains dry a bit slower, and can be thinned, but may carry more color.

If you had some experience in spraying stains and dyes, you could come up with an application that may be faster.




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Appreciate your immediate feedback.

Indeed you've suggested me a wonderful point of keeping tone lighter than that desiered in final project which could be altered during finishing.

I was thinking of treating wood with Pot Permangnate Solution which ultimately gives shades of brown.

Will it work?? What do you suggest??

regards,

Bhavesh
The potassium permanganate solution will stain the wood a little brown. The problem is it will raise the grain in the process and cause you to have to sand some of it off. Mohawk Finishing Products sells a NGR stain, which is a alcohol based aniline dye which with the light walnut color you could do the same thing with and not raise the grain. The dye is also available in powder form which you could get through the mail without all the hasmat fees the alcohol would have. It would then be mixed with a wood alcohol you could get locally. The NGR is better sprayed at low pressure but you can apply it with a rag. Since it's alcohol based you would have to work fast. Wear gloves too, a aniline dye is another term for ink. It will stain your paws too and really it's not good to expose your skin to any solvent. Solvents soak into the skin and get into the bloodstream.
 
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