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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How would one go about tapering a 12' long 1 1/4" diameter ash shaft its full length down to 3/4" at the other end? Could it be turned in some way like a long, skinny cue stick? Or would a skilled woodworker have to take a spokeshave to it?

It's for a historical recreation of a cavalry lance whose center of gravity lies behind its midpoint. Due to my lack of resources, I'll have to have someone do it for me, and I just want to have a clue about what is required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input. From what I understand, a tapering jig horizontally slants the stock so that it is tapered large end to small end. On a round piece of stock that is being successively rotated to obtain an octagonal cross-section, though, wouldn't the tapering removal of the stock eventually begin to alter the angle at which the shaft is being fed through the jig?

How about if I had a long cradle built to hold the shaft and left some full-sized stock at each end of the shaft that would always be held fast against the cradle? Slide the cradle through for a pass, rotate the pole, make the next pass, etc., and then have the ends cut off leaving just the uniformly tapered shaft?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The final product is to be a round tapered shaft, but if it's shaped on a table saw with a tapering jig, it will necessarily have a polygonal cross section that will then have to be smoothed to round. It just occurred to me that if it could be shaped into an octagonal cross section on a cradle ran through the tapering jig, it could be run through eight more times to form a 16-gon that would require less smoothing.
 
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