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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently got a request from a customer that they wanted the edge taken off. Here is what they want the edge taken off of. Its a 2"x2"x30" piece of red oak, what I figured was to mark the 2x2 a half inch in from all sides and kind a make it look like a octagon. Any hints or tips on how to achieve this look with out the loss of a digit. It's too close to run it through the table saw and I dont have a jointer.
 

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I'd run it through the table saw with a stable push block, but that's me. You could try a 1/2" beveled router bit (chamfer) but in a router table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll give it another look on the table saw an see what I can figure out.
 

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Just make sure you have a sharp general purpose blade in there, nothing too fine or it could cause resistence. especially with the blade on a 45.

If I'm ripping something like that I also like to sand the table surface real quick to pick up anything that may prevent a smooth push. I have a few different sprays for machined surfaces that add a nice slick coat on there, but bowling alley wax works good too, and costs much less.

Little things like that can prevent an unwanted kick back and mostly good focus keeps the fingers on the hand. Make sure that stock is straight as an arrow too. Ripping something that narrow with even a slight twist in it can cause an unexpected problem.

Also your last cut will prevent you from having the full 2" against the fence, even with the push block it could teter unless you tape down one of those triangular rips close to the fence for support.

But that's why those giant stop button are close to our knee right!
 

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I use a 6-8" piece of 3/4 plywood about 36" long, and cut a 1.5" notch 30 inches long in it. Then drop that on top of the 2 x 2 so it'll give you something to push it thru the cut. Maybe make the notch a bit longer than 30" to make sure it fits over the piece easily.

You'll still have enough room to see if the 2 x 2 is tight up against the fence as you cut.
 

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Pianoman
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These guys are right on with the table saw or router table. I would use a notched push board that is at least an 1 and 3/4"s x 4" x 12" long. And also make 1 and 3/4" high feather boards before and after the blade!! Rick
 

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In my opinion the safest and easiest would be to use a bandsaw if you have one. Tilt the table and set the fence and away you go.
 

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Old School
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I have a right tilt saw. I would put the fence on the left of the blade with enough blade height to clear the cut. The stock isn't "trapped" to the fence. You could use a modified featherboard that makes contact on the remaining flat. If there is a concern for lack of stability to the table, an angled spacer can be cut to feed in with the stock to ride between the fence and the stock, for an already corner, on the table.

Using a router table will also work, making incremental passes with a chamfering bit. To avoid chattering, the last pass is just a skim pass.






 

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I attach a piece of scrap 1x or 2x to the fence, tilt the blade 45 deg, completely lower the blade, then with the saw running, slowly raise the blade, letting it plunge into the scrap attached to the fence. Do a sample cut on some other scrap to see how big a chamfer it makes then adjust accordingly. Just be sure to lower the blade when adjusting the fence.

You may have to figure a way to use the clamps so they don't interfere with the 2" thick piece you're cutting. I generally do this with flat stock.. 1x, plywood, etc. But it does work well.
 

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