Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After many fun battles with the great folks on this forum I suppose I admit defeat.
I've always been an advocate of running the tablesaw fence "a literal hair" wide at the back for safety. Note: I've never ever had any kickback problems, ever.
But I'm getting tired of sanding the "hair width marks" on the board.
I started running the blade perfect with the fence a few months ago... and I suppose it's been fine. Ok possibly better.
Grr. Hate admitting defeat.
Thanks guys.
 

Attachments

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,591 Posts
welcome to a parallel universe

Coming from "off kilter" how does it feel to be in a parallel universe? :blink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
mdntrdr said:
If you were getting those type of saw marks, your fence was toed out more than a hair. :smile:
Ha! I would certainly starve my family as a woodworker... but I'm not quite that bad!
Obviously an exaggerated picture for crying out loud.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
I would first make absolutely sure the blade is 100% square with the miter slot.

I had those problems also, and when I installed my incra fence, I went through the whole realignment regiment starting with the blade and following thru and ending with the fence. No more marks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,932 Posts
When you offset the fence it's a hair over the length of the fence, not front to back of the blade. That distance is so small, it's imperceptible at the blade but it does keep the rear teeth from making a second contact with the cut edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,945 Posts
I would first make absolutely sure the blade is 100% square with the miter slot.

I had those problems also, and when I installed my incra fence, I went through the whole realignment regiment starting with the blade and following thru and ending with the fence. No more marks.
You mean parallel, not square.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
You mean parallel, not square.

George
Square.

yes. it has to be 100% inline with the miter slot.

When checking the blade for square to miter slot, I use my Incra 1000se, which I check to be square to the miter, then using the same square i used for the 1000, I check the blade. worked for me.

To others looking on. Am I wrong in doing this??/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
There is no wrong or right here, I toe out more than most and my cuts are jointer grade, ready for glue up.

Possible reasons for the marks are:

1.) Blade quality.

2.) Saw vibration.

3.) Feeding way too fast.

4.) Not using a damper on the nut and flange which secures the blade to the arbor of your saw.

I cut molding coves with a combination blade with toe out of more than 45 degrees and the cuts are square and cleaner than the board pictured.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,591 Posts
Not square!

Square.

yes. it has to be 100% inline with the miter slot.

Inline is parallel,...not square.
The fence, blade and miter slot should all be parallel to each other.

When checking the blade for square to miter slot, I use my Incra 1000se, which I check to be square to the miter, then using the same square i used for the 1000, I check the blade. worked for me.
In the first 2 instances, square is a "condition".... but wrong. The 3rd instance square is a tool... You are confused and confusing the terms don't help others. :no:
The "condition" square means at 90 degrees. The "tool" square is made of 2 pieces joined at 90 degrees.

To others looking on. Am I wrong in doing this??/
You can do what ever you like, but the terms you used do not work in reality. :blink:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top