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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Im looking at buying a new Delta table saw just for weekend work and occasional projects and have couple questions.

1- Why are the left tilt saws cheaper than right tilt. Most of their left tilt saws include fence and table extension whereas the right tilt saws of the same model do not, yet are priced the same.

2- I am right handed if that makes a difference. Will it be worth it to me to buy a right tilt saw? I cant really see what difference it makes other than the way cuts are beveled, obviously.

3- I am considering the 10" 3hp for $1500 but am wondering if I really need a 3hp saw. I notice they have a 1 3/4 hp hybrid saw package for $1250. Would this be sufficient for my needs or should I be safe and go with the 3 hp. It is possible I might start building some cabinets for houses I renovate.


Thanks in advance for input/advice.
 

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You don't need 3HP for a saw but the things that come with a
"cabinet saw" are worth haveing.
My old contractor 1 1/2 hp was power enough for all my needs,
but when I switched to a cabinet saw I was really impressed.
It holds its trueness and is so much easier to adjust.
That's the advantage, the accuracy.
A true cabinet saw has it's trunouns fixed mounted so they stay tight
and in line, you move the table top to allign for the blade,
so much easier and better.
Cabinet saws do a better job for many more reasons,
more than just the power side of it.:thumbsup:
 

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When I started out all I could afford was a circular saw, and wound up mounting it underneath a sheet of plywood. Built many custom cabinets with that set up. My next table saw was a cheapo Sears model with a direct drive motor, which I doubt was 1 HP. That motor suffered severe meltdown cutting a 1.25" bullet rated polycarbonate window that I was making for a check cashing store.


My next saw was a 10" Unisaw, 3 HP, right tilt, with the factory 50" rails, that came with it, because it was before the Biesemeyer came out. I had to put the saw on a payment plan. I must say it was a big difference. Literally a pleasure to work on. When the Biesemeyer came out, I bought a 50" setup, and it turned the saw into a precision machine, cutting measuring time, and increasing accuracy.

I might suggest if you are well heeled and can afford a cabinet saw, you won't be disappointed with a 3 HP version. As for right/left tilt, it seems that the right tilt is more popular, and one gets used to working the saw. I will also suggest that a 1.5 HP contractors saw with a 50" "T" square type fence, right table and a sizable outfeed table makes the work more effortless and would be less expensive that a cabinet saw. A good carbide tipped blade appropriate for the procedure can make a huge difference in the quality of the work.

When considering a saw keep in mind whether it is 110V or 220V, single or 3 phase, and if you are wired properly to accommodate the saw.

So, what I'm saying is buying new will afford you equipment that hasn't been used. If you buy used to get started, check out the equipment with a knowledgeable person for any defects. I wouldn't make a purchase like that off of CL or Ebay, unless it was a local sale.




 

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For only $250 more the 3HP is an easy choice. Just because x number of horsepower was good enough for someone else doesn't mean it's good enough for everyone. I have never understood that kind of thinking. You might find yourself needing more HP on a project and you will be glad to have it. That's why you find saws of many different HP ratings because there are applications where some saws will struggle.
If you could not afford the 3HP then by all means get the weaker model. It will cut wood just fine for most applications.

But if you can afford the 3HP please don't believe the notion that's it's wasted money. I say this because it always starts out as "weekend projects and occassional use" like you intend. Then you find yourself upgrading and spending more. If you decide to get out after all, a 3HP cabinet saw will hold its resale value better too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
thanks for the input. ive decided to go ahead and get the 3hp saw. i have it narrowed to these two. if anyone has a saw with the router table attached id appreciate your input. will i be better off just buying the saw and building my own router station or is it worth it to spend the extra $100 and have the router table added on. I guess what im getting at is, is there something wrong with the router table attached to the saw as opposed to having separate stations? and while im asking, I have never heard of Grizzly until i came to this forum. They seem like quality tools, is this right?

edit: also, i wont be purchasing this saw for a few months. does grizzly ever offer any sales or rebates i should wait for?



G1023SLW 10" Left-Tilt Cabinet Table Saw
$1,050.00

^^ this one is 3 hp left tilt with router table attachment $1200 total with shipping.



G1023S 10" Table Saw 3 HP Single-Phase 220V
$995.00

^^this one is 3hp right tilt saw only. $1100 total with shipping.
 

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Grizzly is extremely popular with serious hobbyists and light industrial users. The machinery is as good as most better imports, and is typically priced lower than their competition b/c of their "direct importer" philosophy that skips the dealer. There's definitely some benefit from having good dealer support, but there are savings if you don't think you need it. Griz has smaller hand and bench tools that I don't think are at the same level as their machinery, but they're a reputable company to deal with. Grizzly's president is an accomplished woodworker and luthier, and he spends a fair amount of time cruising woodworking forums...nice to have that kind of interest level. Griz doesn't have too many sales, but the 1023SL was offered for $100 off up until 12/31/07. Note that the 1023S does not have a motor cover included. I don't think you'll regret buying the more substantial saw. Just be aware that over 2hp requires 220v operation.

The left tilt/right tilt debate is a matter of preference, and there are legitimate pros and cons to each. I've owned both and prefer left tilt but I wouldn't let the issue prevent me from getting a good deal on a nice saw. Left tilt is said to be safer when making beveled cuts b/c the blade tilts away from the fence in it's normal operating position. Right tilt fans counter that argument by moving the fence to the other side of the blade for bevel cuts, but it's still not quite as safe b/c it's a less familiar operation until you've done it a bunch of times. With a LT the arbor flange is on the left side, meaning that changes in blade thickness can effect the "zero" reference on the measuring tape....minor changes are easy enough to compensate for by moving the cursor or using spacers for the thinner blades, and for thick dado blades you can always measure with a hand tape. One plus for the LT IMO is that the arbor nut threads from the right side so I can install it with my dominant right hand, plus it uses a normal thread orientation. A right tilt saw's arbor nut gets installed from the left, and has a reverse thread orientation...it's a minor thing to some folks, but I was always pretty aware of it.

Having a router table attached to the TS is a great space saving move. If you've got the space, a separate RT has some advantages, but as compromises go, a RT in the TS works out great for those shy on room. You may want to work out some sort of separate fence or fence attachment for the RT.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
wow thanks for all the info knotscott. i did notice that id need to work out a fence or attachment for the router table, which shouldnt be a problem. 220v isnt an issue either. thanks for helping me decide.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
a stupid question probably but ive never bought a new cabinet table saw before. do they come equipped with a power cord and how long is it normally?
 

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Power Cords

a stupid question probably but ive never bought a new cabinet table saw before. do they come equipped with a power cord and how long is it normally?
I can't speak to all brands but Grizzly cabinet saws do come with the cord but not the plug )at least mine did). I rigged up a cord reel as I didn't want to cut the cord off but I also didn't want all that cord on the floor.

Paul
 

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I had a Grizzly jointer once, and it did what it was supposed to do, but the one I had also had some vibration that I just couldn't seem to tune out. I sold it. I got a delta 8" replacement that was perfect out of the box. That said, I've since rebuilt an old 12" Crescent, that is a joy to use, quieter and smoother still. I have a 66 left tilt and a uni right tilt. I agree, the left tilt is probably safer, but I like my uni better. Just for the record, I'd also consider a SawStop. They are certainly a bit more expensive, but they are the safest of all. My buddy, who teaches fine woodworking at a local trades school, has changed all the school saws to these and is quite satisfied with the quality. Of course the safety feature was probably his main reason, but again, he feels they work well.
paul
 
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