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the first c-man is a great saw. if that motor is a dual voltage motor, it's worth $150-200. slap a delta t2 or vega 40" fence on it and it'll do whatever you need to do with the right blade. the second c-man is basically the same saw, but probably with a 1 hp motor and stamped steel extension wings (the first one has the preferred CI webbed wings). the second one also needs a new/better fence, so it's kind of a toss up. the first one is in better shape. check to see if either has the splitter/blade guard assembly, an important safety item. good luck.
 

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The Hitachi is plastic, aluminum, small, lightweight, loud, less reliable, less precise, unfeasible to repair, has little upgrade potential, but it is portable if that's what you need..... or, the other is cast iron, steel, has a large operating area, is stable, quiet, easy to repair, standard size, has more torque, and has excellent upgrade potential down the road.

Read the links that have been posted multiple times. ...they could help you understand the differences, and make the best choice.
The Craftsman looks like its on casters.




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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I guess I am looking for a bigger table to rip down plywood, the guy selling the craftsmen is willing to go 150 and the hitachi is 100 bucks????
 

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I would go with the belt drive craftsman. I hate direct drive saws. Loud, really loud. Most people don't need 3hp, anyway that is improperly stated. That 3hp is max developed. The craftsman saws used to be rated that way.
The cast iron wings make the saw stable by adding to the weight. $150 is a good price. Ripping plywood needs a stable platform.
 

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The craftsmen is. 1.5 hp and the hitachi is a 3.5 hp
The 3.5hp isn't a realistic or usable rating (well maybe if struck by lightning...). It's a "theoretical max developed hp" rating milliseconds before the motor goes up in smoke. Basically marketing lies. As explained in the TS links, any motor that's truly more than 2hp will need to run on 220v, or would require an unusually heavy duty 110v circuit. The 1.5hp induction motor will have more usable power. The fence is the weak link on Cman, but can be upgraded.
 

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Depending on how big a hurry you're in, it might be worth it to wait. The craftsman is quite old, and definitely not "like new." It's at least 15 years old, probably much older. It's got potential, but it's also got the ancient angle iron rails. Those fences that work on those are really a chore to set up for every cut so they're not dangerous. It may not seem like it right now, but it really is worth it to get a good rip fence that's reliable for every cut. You don't want a fence that's going to push wood into the blade and cause a kickback.

A decent fence looks like this:

 

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Certainly, but you're looking at a couple of hundred. Where as I see new craftman's and rigids already with a good enough fence for $175 - $300 almost every other day. That has a lot to do with the fact that I'm near the Dallas/Ft worth area. But, I imagine with patience, you could find something ready to go in your area in a short time.
 

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A very good fence for that saw is the delta t2 which will cost you 150-200. If you could get the guy down to 135....(point out the inaccuracies of that fence) I'd jump on it. It looks like its been very well maintained.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Yes I has I just bought it, the fence locks into place very well and doesn't move, which is good I talked him down to 140 not too bad.. It does slide a little rough but I am sure a little wd-40 may go a long way???
 

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Those fences can be made to slide very easily and they definitely lock down tight. The problem is they do not square themselves up anywhere close to accurately like the newer fences do when you tighten them down.

Anyway, clean the table up the rest of the way with some 400 grit on a sanding block, then protect and polish it with some T-9 and GlideCote. T-9 protects against rust happening again so quickly, and the GlideCote makes things slide very easily as well as adding a little more rust protection.

I use a Wixey digital angle gauge to make sure my cuts are the exact angle I want. Never rely on the angle indicator on the saw.
 

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I don't know if anyone asked or if it was stated, but what do you plan on doing? There certainly are many tasks that might be fine for the Hitachi. I just know that if the space is available, a larger saw is better for so many reasons. If you just have a specific task in mind, it'll make it easy to determine if the Hitachi would work. If you're starting out with hopes and dreams of building all sorts of neat stuff from cabinets to picture frames, the larger saw is the way to go.
 

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Yes I has I just bought it, the fence locks into place very well and doesn't move, which is good I talked him down to 140 not too bad.. It does slide a little rough but I am sure a little wd-40 may go a long way???
did it come with the splitter/blade guard? very important safety item as there aren't, to the best of my knowledge, any aftermarket riving knives that are applicable to that saw. also, the fence on the saw in RD's posting, while not a t2 or a vega 40, is exactly like the OEM fence on my ridgid ts2412. a fence like that is every bit as good as either of the aforementioned aftermarket fences and will provide years of trouble free service is properly aligned.
 
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