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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son-in-law did some work in my wood shop. I wasn't in the shop to give him any help so he was on his own. Not being a person that has worked with shop equipment he doesn't have a lot of knowledge with shop equipment. He thought that the table saw made a very nice sanding table. He made sanding swirls in my table saw top. Has anybody ever had this happen and how would this be repairable?
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Unless there's gouges I wouldn't worry about it. I know a few guys that run a sander over their tops every so often to minimize rust and whatnot. If it really bothers you....you need to polish and sand the entire top working progressively up in grit to make it uniform.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unless there's gouges I wouldn't worry about it. I know a few guys that run a sander over their tops every so often to minimize rust and whatnot. If it really bothers you....you need to polish and sand the entire top working progressively up in grit to make it uniform.
I would never run a sander over my table saw top and I always keep a good layer of wax on all my equipment tops. This being precision I was wondering if there is something better then sand paper?
 

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You can't remove the scratches without taking off more metal. Polishing the surface would help blend them in, but even that is removing minute amounts of metal. I'm sure it annoys you, but IMO you're better off just leaving it alone.

If you ever saw the grinder swirls on my old Craftsman table saw you'd realize how insignificant some scratches are. Except of course cosmetically.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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That's my point. Most table tops are full of swirl marks. And running 400 grit sand papers going to take what .00001 off? Woodworking isn't measured in those tolerances....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's my point. Most table tops are full of swirl marks. And running 400 grit sand papers going to take what .00001 off? Woodworking isn't measured in those tolerances....
I know you are right on this. And my table saw has natural wear marks from use. I have always tried to keep the top of my table looking as clean as the day I bought it. I guess the swirl marks just upset me. I did use the steel wool and gave it a good coat of wax. I don't feel any of the marks anymore but can see them. When someone other then myself that uses my shop I like to be there to watch. When family uses my shop I just can't say no and I don't blame my son-in-law because he didn't know. I have a special wooden bench set up just for my sanding which I do sand down and wax. I also use a sanding pad which I made from carpet backing.
 

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Vbryanv
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I know this is an old thread but I figured I would share the information that I got from grizzly. I got my second table saw from Grizzly after I had issues with the first one and it has scratches across the main top and light scratches also on the extension wings. While I was on the phone with Grizzly I asked them what I could do to get those scratches out and they gave me some options.

1. Get Scotch-Brite start with the green one and scrub with the grit.. then use the very fine grit and then move on to the ultra fine grit. I asked about using WD-40 and almost got yelled at. He said nope do it dry. He said I can also use a jitterbug sander and attach the Scotch-Brite to that. Being that I don't have a jitterbug he said I can use an orbital sander or a palm sander. He said I'd be very surprised how well does Scotch-Brite remove scratches . I did it by hand

2. get buffing compound the green one and start with the coarsest grit and buff it and then step it to the finer grits. when you're done polish it and apply wax

3. Start with 400 grit sandpaper and sand with the grain to see if the scratches come out. If they don't use a courser grit. then continue to step it with 800, 1000, 1500 and then 2000. Then wax

On the first extension wing I started by sanding it. When I was done I could still see fine scratches. but I think that was my fault for not sanding enough between the grits. So I used the scouring pads then polished and and was able to get it smooth as glass and shiny as hell

On the second extension wing I started with the scouring pads but at the end didn't like the way it felt so I went to the buffing compound. At the end I polished and waxed it. I was able to get it smooth and very shiny but it wasn't as smooth as the first extension wing. I think the Sandpaper made the difference

I still have to do the main too but I can't feel my arms right now.

Make sure you're careful sanding and you don't sand too much because you are taking Material off.

If you do a search online there are a lot of contradicting ways for you to remove scratches from the table top. So I figured I'd share what Grizzly told me and my experience as well.

good luck
 

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If you do a search online there are a lot of contradicting ways for you to remove scratches from the table top. So I figured I'd share what Grizzly told me and my experience as well.
WOW! That table is really purrrrrty....Glad to see that you finally got your table saw meeting your expectations.

Great process for all milled tops in the wood shop!

Eric
 

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Vbryanv
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Are you going to shoot the first one of your buddies that sets a sweaty beer can on it LOL
I am not sure I would use that saw. I might put a scratch in it.
I can see where people get the obsession with chisels.. It is very satisfying. I look at it and think if I would have spent a couple more hours on it I wonder how much better it would look. Seems worth it.. I may have to buy some chisels
 

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Interested Observer
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Not really making a judgment. I look at such things with a bit of wry amusement and a bit of jealous envy knowing that I am sure it was a satisfyingly project that I would never spend the time doing.
 

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Vbryanv
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Not really making a judgment. I look at such things with a bit of wry amusement and a bit of jealous envy knowing that I am sure it was a satisfyingly project that I would never spend the time doing.

I guess the best way to look at it don't knock it till you try it... For months I have been reading threads on this forum and others or people spending hours on their tools but felt the same way you did. I said damn looks like I never have a chisel that sharp unless I can pay someone. I don't think I'll ever waste the little time I have doing that.. But after this I understand.. Still don't know if I will ever do it again but it was satisfying. I'm still sore
 

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I do use a sander on my table saw and it works fine. Granted, I go a bit overboard, working through the grits on my ROS and palm sander up to about 1200 grit, at which point the table is dead clean and shiny and slippery as you want even without wax. We just have to remember that these are tools, not pieces of art. It doesn't matter how they look, it matters how they work.
 

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My son-in-law did some work in my wood shop. I wasn't in the shop to give him any help so he was on his own. Not being a person that has worked with shop equipment he doesn't have a lot of knowledge with shop equipment. He thought that the table saw made a very nice sanding table. He made sanding swirls in my table saw top. Has anybody ever had this happen and how would this be repairable?
You would remove the swirl marks the same way you would remove the swirl marks from wood. Sand it with a finer grit sandpaper. Some of my machinery gets rained on occasionally and rusts. The easiest fix is to use an orbital sander with 220 grit sandpaper and clean the rust off. You can't take off enough metal with a sander to hurt it.
 

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I use a wire cup brush and a drill to freshen the table top on my unisaw. but it gets used often.


that wont hurt that saw in the least. when your saw is 30+ years old like mine, you will wish that was the only marks on the table top.
 
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