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That could of been ugly! I need some safety rules on a table saw. The dos and donts. First day wood shop safety. Don't reach across the blade I got that. What else?
 

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What could have been "ugly?"

I gather you are new here.

Welcome. How about a little more information about whatever??? and yourself.

George
 

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Thintz's kickback video is so funny to me, I guess it's just how he says things.
Splitters are good I feel. Biggest thing IMO is never get too comfortable, that's when I make my mistakes.
 

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- Always use a guide...miter gauge or fence
- Don't use the fence and miter gauge at the same time
- Keep a good quality sharp blade on the saw that's suitable for the task
- Use push sticks and feather boards whenever possible
- Use a splitter
- Get the alignment spot on
 

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Discussion Starter #8
GeorgeC said:
What could have been "ugly?"

I gather you are new here.

Welcome. How about a little more information about whatever??? and yourself.

George
Yes I'm new here and to woodworking. My girlfriend brought home a puppy and I need a dog house. The were so expensive I decided to build one. I found a simple design online using only very little material. Wood is surprisingly expensive. Took my material to a buddy's house to use his tools.
I enjoyed making it so much I've built 9 for friends. I have also bought a circular saw(used), two table saws(both used). A orbital sander, jig saw, shop vac. I received a 2nd circular for Father's Day brand new one. Now I spend every spare moment in the garage (my girlfriend hates it) I have a millions questions about everything from saw blades to finishes.
 

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Yes I'm new here and to woodworking. My girlfriend brought home a puppy and I need a dog house. The were so expensive I decided to build one. I found a simple design online using only very little material. Wood is surprisingly expensive. Took my material to a buddy's house to use his tools.
I enjoyed making it so much I've built 9 for friends. I have also bought a circular saw(used), two table saws(both used). A orbital sander, jig saw, shop vac. I received a 2nd circular for Father's Day brand new one. Now I spend every spare moment in the garage (my girlfriend hates it) I have a millions questions about everything from saw blades to finishes.
Welcome to the forum.:thumbsup:

As mentioned we can't possibly give you all the advice needed, nor will you be able to read about everything. You can try but there is always something you miss.

1. Use all the safety equipment provided with tools.
2. Never think you know it all or it won't happen to you.
3. Use push stick etc and never use a table saw without a fence, miter gauge or sled etc. ( no free hand work)

4. don't get to comfortable as mentioned
5. Read as much as you can on safety but if your gut says, " hey something ain't right" listen to it.

6. Must read this thread. Full of experienced people getting hurt including myself.

Probably lots of other rules like, " how far to keep your hands away from blade?" Etc but you will find them in the thread I linked to.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
rrbrown

Hey leatherneck, i was looking at your pics, did you lay that floor? You cabinets are beautiful. Your shop is even better looking. 1st MarDiv myself
 

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There are some really good books about table saws....I'd suggest any of these:

Jim Tolpin's "Table Saw Magic"

"The Table Saw" by Kelly Mehler

"The New Woodwork Handbook" by Tom Hintz
 

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Of course, you COULD get a band saw...

After reading through the page that rrbrown linked too, I don't think I will ever own a table saw until I can afford a saw stop. But that's just me.

Also, from what I have read, when I do get a table saw, I will probably get a riving knife (as opposed to a splitter) and use the shorter, European style fences.

I like my hands.

~~~~~~

Having said this, I think I read a fine woodworking article (or one of the other well known magazines) that said each year more finger amputations are caused by doors than by table saws.
 

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short fences

just me.

Also, from what I have read, when I do get a table saw, I will probably get a riving knife (as opposed to a splitter) and use the shorter, European style fences.
I think the shorter European fences solve a problem that doesn't exist and create one that you won't expect...
If you are concerned about the work being wedged/trapped at the back of the blade and use a shorter fence to solve that problem, just toe the fence out at the rear a "smidge". I don't do this,but others find it "necessary".

The problem that is created, comes from running a long board with just a slight curve against the fence. The tip of the board that's touching at the rear will ride off the end of the fence and you will repeat that same curve in your opposite edge. I like a very long fence for this reason...it gives me straighter cuts. I also use a board straighten jig, if the work is curved:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/board-straightening-jig-table-saw-16999/

 
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As most folks have said here, if your saw comes with a particular piece of safety equipment, use it. It makes no sense to leave the bladeguard or anti-kickback pawls off. Obviously when making dado or other non-through cuts these and other safety features such as riving knifes my be taken off, but if you can accomplish the task without removing the safety equipment, do so. Also, never use the rip-fence as a stop for crosscutting, that's just asking for a piece of lumber to go flying around the shop. I never use my hand as a push-stick, have several different push sticks of varying widths for different width cuts, but I just don't want my hand that close to a blade spinning at thousands of RPMs. Lastly, and this is mostly me trying to develop good habits now that I have a little one that I don't want wondering into the shop and accidentally turning the saw on, I always retract the blade, unplug the saw, and remove the yellow safety-key from the switch whenever I leave the shop, I'll admit pre-baby I wasn't as good about these last measures but now I'm pretty much religious about following them.
 

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rrbrown

Hey leatherneck, i was looking at your pics, did you lay that floor? You cabinets are beautiful. Your shop is even better looking. 1st MarDiv myself

Thank You and yes I did everything from structural through finishing including plumbing,electrical,HAVC,flooring, Drywall, cabinets...... I did that through out the entire 3200 sqft house over 10 years. Finished it 6 months before Katrina took it.:laughing: never again.
 

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After reading through the page that rrbrown linked too, I don't think I will ever own a table saw until I can afford a saw stop. But that's just me.

Also, from what I have read, when I do get a table saw, I will probably get a riving knife (as opposed to a splitter) and use the shorter, European style fences.

I like my hands.
While that thread has table saw injuries it also has injuries from chisels, band saws, jointers and just about any other tool out there. No better place to learn what not to do then from those who found out the hard way.including myself.:thumbsup:

Most times it comes down to complacency because when you do something to often you let your guard down so to speak. It's human nature. No one goes out there thinking I guess I'll cut my finger off today.
 
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