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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the market for a new table saw and jointer, only thing is I have the funds for only one right now. With my budget being about 700 dollars. I am watching craigslist constantly, so hopefully I can get both. But let's say I buy new, what one should I get first? Right now I have a cheap table saw from skil that is a bench top. I am getting into building bookshevles, coat racks and night stands. I have a lumberyard very close with cheap prices for rough sawn lumber, so I would love a jointer to take full advantage of that place, but once I would joint the wood and plane it down I would be stuck using the crap table saw. But should I get a good saw then be at a loss with the rough sawn wood from the yard? Any suggestions would be great!
 

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You can do with a table saw most of what you can do with a jointer, but you cant use a jointer to do what a table saw can. Since you already have a table saw, the big question is how satisfied are you with your current saw? Cut through everything you need it to? Wide enough fence range, etc? If any of those is even "not quite", id prioritize the table saw

For $700 you should be able to buy 2 decent quality new tools. A decent contractor or hybrid saw is generally in the 4-600 dollar range, and something like a benchtop 6 inch jointer ive seen around 2-300, and honestly the benchtop ones are usually sufficient for hobbyist use.

Last note, id prioritize a thickness planer over a jointer. Sure, you cant edge joint a board with a planer, but you can face a board with the right jigs and use the table saw to edge joint materials. Personally, i see the thickness planer as a somewhat more versatile machine, and the price range for a smaller one is near the same as the aforementioned jointer.

Okay, this is the last note, a TL:DR version of sorts: $700 would be more than enough to get both tools if youre willing to buy used. Id recommend keeping an eye out for an older contractor style table saw, as theyre generally powerful enough for home use and available at decent costs. Id also recommend going for a thickness planer over a jointer at first, due to the planers increased versatility at the same price point
 

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Buy the Ridgid R4512 table saw and find a used Craftsmen jointer on Craigslist. Easily done for 700, problem solved! I have the Ridgid and wouldn't hesitate to buy it again. I've had it for about a year and a half.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using woodworkingtalk.com mobile app
 

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Start with a rough sawn board. Run it across the jointer on the flat side until it cuts flat.
With the flat side against the fence, run one edge over it until smooth. You now have a flat side and an edge 90 deg to it.
Run it through the planer until you obtain the desired thickness.
Use the table saw to rip your stock to the desired width.

Only you can decide what to buy.
Good luck.
Mike
 

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where's my table saw?
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it's also a safety issue!

Any boards cut using a table saw MUST be first straightened and flattened on a joiner OR you will get a pinch or wobble which will result in a kickback. Straight and flat is where it's at on the table saw. Seriously. :yes:

Plywood is not an issue because it's basically flat when you get it.... usually. Hardwood lumber, rough sawn, is where a good jointer will save you money and give you the ability to make many more projects.

A fully equipped shop would have in my order of priority:
As large a table saw as you can afford and store.
A jojnter with as wide and long tables as you can afford.
A 15" wide a planer is just fine, since your jointer is the limiting factor.
As large a bandsaw as possible, for resawing and making curves....
A table mounted router with a lift for profiling edges and several hand held routers in various weights and sizes.
A a powerful dust collection system and a good shop vac.
As far as shop environment and hand tools goes:
Great lighting.
A large heavy workbench with good woodworking vises for hand planing work AND a separate assembly table for making glue ups.
Lots of clamps, squeeze and pipe in various lengths.
A collection of hand planes in various lengths and widths.
Good hand chisels.
A few pull saws and a dovetail saw.
etc , etc, .... :yes:
 

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I am in the market for a new table saw and jointer, only thing is I have the funds for only one right now. With my budget being about 700 dollars. I am watching craigslist constantly, so hopefully I can get both. But let's say I buy new, what one should I get first? Right now I have a cheap table saw from skil that is a bench top. I am getting into building bookshevles, coat racks and night stands. I have a lumberyard very close with cheap prices for rough sawn lumber, so I would love a jointer to take full advantage of that place, but once I would joint the wood and plane it down I would be stuck using the crap table saw. But should I get a good saw then be at a loss with the rough sawn wood from the yard? Any suggestions would be great!
As I wipe the sleep from my eyes, I re read your post. If you could find a jointer, that would be great. You could still use your current saw with a rip blade to rip your lumber.

Say you find a jointer. Now you can...
Make a cutlist for your project.
Crosscut your material if possible to make shorter lengths.
If the board is bowed or crooked, you could use the jointer to create a straight edge or make a simple rip sled which works great for ripping a straight side on crooked material. That would depend on whether or not your table saw top is big enough to support it. A temporary outfeed and/or infeed table would be very beneficial.

"Woodnthings" has made a sled that would work great for this operation. It is much easier to straighten shorter boards than long ones.

What I am trying to convey is a jointer would be an immediate improvement to your work shop.

Here are some pics of a sled I made to rip rough lumber on the table saw. It is about four feet long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone! I believe I'm leaning towards a jointer. I already have a 12 1/2 inch planer I got this spring that was too good of a deal to pass up. So with those two I can really square up some boards. I'll just keep my eyes posted for a good table saw.
 

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I think Craigslist is your best friend. For now and later.

I bought my 1948 unisaw for $160 with no fence just the original rails and the original motor.

I got a 50" Vega pro TS fence for $165

I got a restored Delta 6" jointer from the 1940's with a new motor and fresh paint for $200

I got all these off Craigslist and within 30 minutes of my house. If you wait for a deal to come up you can save quite a bit of money.

Craftsman 6" jointers are always listed for $200 or less and table saws are just as common.

If I were you, I'd buy the best used tools I could find. Then as you continue, sell the used tools and buy new.
 

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I think Craigslist is your best friend. For now and later.
...
If I were you, I'd buy the best used tools I could find. Then as you continue, sell the used tools and buy new.
Sage advice there. But I'd amend it to say - as you continue, sell the used tools and buy better used tools. rinse and repeat. If you can find what you want on CL, why buy new?
 

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where's my table saw?
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My first power tool was a table saw

Table saw first beyond any doubt.

George
My first stationary power tool was a Craftsman 10" 1 HP table saw. Back then, I didn't know any better .... I was just 18 years old .... and cut many boards and plywood, using the fence to rip and miter gauge to crosscut. I didn't think I needed a splitter/guard and it was set off to the side in a drawer.
I had a few kickbacks and never really understood why.
Once in a while a piece of plywood would come away from the fence at the back and rise up and over the blade and hit me in the gut.... I never knew why.

I didn't get a jointer for about 5 years later or so and I still didn't understand why I really needed it or how to
get a square edge to a flat surface. Somehow after more years of use without any serious accidents, I began to figure out some very basic rules of "safe table saw use'

The first was to always use a splitter to keep the kerf open AND to maintain the workpiece snug against the fence to avoid those spinning/rotating workpieces.
My splitter now always stays on except for partial through cuts.... especially when ripping hardwood lumber which can pinch the back of the blade unexpectedly resulting in a stall or a kickback.

The second was a realization that a curved board or one that was not perfectly straight and flat would wobble or twist during the pass and either stall or kickback... OH! that's why I needed the joiner, to make boards straight, flat and square.

The third realization was that the two machines are a team AND you need them both for the safest operation of the table saw. If you mainly cut sheet goods plywood, MFD etc. you don't really need a jointer. If you cut rough sawn boards, with twist or curves that's where the jointer is necessary.

So the answer to the question ..."Which should I get first?" ... is it depends on what you are doing and the type of material you intend to cut. I would invest in a quality table saw either new or used with a good fence and not settle for anything less.:no:
Believe it or not, the FENCE is the heart of the table saw and is the most used device on the machine. It had better be easy to use and self squaring OR you will not be a happy woodworker. I have 2 types of fences, the Biesmeyer and Unifence both of which are great and have distinct advantages over one another. ... But that's a whole different discussion.......
 

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I don't understand why so many woodworkers are poor as church mice when It comes to buying tools.

Al
Uh, ......fixed income, retired? Buy as the deals come along I do! Took me 5 years to accumulate the ww stuff I have now.
 

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I don't understand why so many woodworkers are poor as church mice when It comes to buying tools.

Al
There are sometimes much more important things that have to be taken care of than woodworking tools.

I am sure that my daughter appreciates the trip she took to Japan with her theatre group much more than any tool I would have in my shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks everyone for all the help! I'm asking for this help because I want to make the best possible decision and not throw my money away. I work hard for what I have and my wife stays at home with my daughter, we are not poor, but money does not grow on trees. If it did I would not ask for suggestions and just go buy every tool out there.
 

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epicfail48 said:
Because we'd rather have 2 decent tools over one perfect one. Or because most of us are flat broke, either or
What do you drive? We spend tons on a car that almost makes it to the end of our payments.

Decent tools don't cost money. They are an investment. If you buy a cheap tool your just throwing your money away.

Al
 
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