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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, based on suggestions from this and other forums, I purchased a TS from CL. A Delta 10" contractor saw model #36-472. It came with 1 CI wing and a 32" extension table. Unifence, woodcraft mobile base, 2 blades (a freud and B&D piranha), regular and zero clearance inserts, the factory miter gauge and the original paperwork. But he was missing a couple of bolts that attach the fence to the table. He was asking $250 and I didn't try to haggle since he delivered it. I don't have a truck, so it was a big help he brought it to me.

The top of the table has some surface rust, drink rings and such. I have tried some steel wool and wd40, but it doesn't seem to be helping much. I'll just keep at it though. As log as it's smooth, that's all i care about.

My question is, is there anything in particular I should check or "tune up" before I start using it? Should I lube or oil anything?

Thanks,
Bill M
 

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Make sure your saw is tuned up properly. I bought a book called The Complete Table Saw Book and it details how you can go about tuning your saw.

I was lucky in that my saw didn't have much in the way of surface issues. I took some fine steel wool & mineral spirits to it anyways, and then waxed it afterwards.

I also replaced the drive belt on my saw. I think from sitting around for so long the original stretched out quite a bit. I put one of those PowerTwist V-Belt's on my saw and that made a big difference in performance.

I would go to your local hardware store and find some bolts for the fence. Shouldn't be that big of a deal. Sounds like you scored a nice saw!

My saw has made a HUGE difference in the quality of my work. Once you get your saw tuned up and ready to cut, I'm sure you'll be saying the same thing!

p.s. hang on to that B&D blade. I use my junk blades on MDF and other similar boards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rob, thanks for the tips on the book and the other stuff. I'm a newb , so I need all the help I can get. :smile:
 

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Spray that top liberally with WD-40, get your palm sander with ~ 100 grit, and go to town, wiping frequently, respraying, and going to progessively finer paper. A few hours of elbow grease will work wonders.

Find some info about blade alignment and check it, set the fence, adjust the belt...maybe add a linkbelt, get a good blade, and install a set of PALS.
 

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I'm a n00b too and I think the book is a great resource. It also comes with some projects that you can work on as well. A few them I plan to start on after the new year.
 

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Don't be too concerned about the rings on the table. As long as it's smooth and flat is all that matters. The rest is cosmetic. You want the saw to cut at 90 degrees when the arrow points to 90. So there is an adjustment that will make it right. Find it. Usually it is a stop bolt that stops the angle adjustment at the correct point. Make sure it is exactly 90 degrees at the stop. Use a good square and check the cut after. Reset if it is off. You can figure it out. Also you want your table to be parallel to the blade, this is usually done with the bolts that hold the table on. If it is off then loosen these bolts just a bit and tap the table with a rubber mallet to align it. These are the most important setups.
When you use the fence you should set this up also. I don't know your fence but the same common sense rules apply. There are adjustments for everything.
Keep the top waxed and rust will be at bay. Use good blades and keep your hands away from the red area on the insert. Pay attention and respect the tool. It is powerful. When you make cuts with the fence be careful for kick backs. Use push sticks and keep your body away from the right side of the blade. If a piece flies it won't hit you.
Read about safety with a TS and again be careful.
Enjoy the saw it will serve you well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Before/after pics and a question (TS)

Thanks to everyone for the tips. I used my ROS with 100 grit and WD-40. Took about 45 minutes. Still can see some rust rings. But she is smooth and slick.

See the last pic concerning my question. The directions call for the bolt that holds the on/off switch to go through the hole on the left. But because of the webbing under the table, I couldn't get it on without tilting it to one side. So I used the hole beside it. The only reason I mention it is because I had to put the cords under a little bit of tension to reach that second hole. Anybody else ever have this problem?






 

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I just paid 550 for a new unifence...:furious: .....I thought I did o.k...good deal and a good fence, no the best fence.....:yes: you just need to make up a panel cutter and some other jigs and away you go...
 

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Find some info about blade alignment and check it, set the fence, adjust the belt...maybe add a linkbelt, get a good blade, and install a set of PALS.
I agree completely. Spending a few dollars and a little time will make your woodworking experience much more enjoyable from the get-go.
The saw looks great BTW.
 

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See the last pic concerning my question. The directions call for the bolt that holds the on/off switch to go through the hole on the left. But because of the webbing under the table, I couldn't get it on without tilting it to one side. So I used the hole beside it. The only reason I mention it is because I had to put the cords under a little bit of tension to reach that second hole. Anybody else ever have this problem?
It looks like if you grinded the top corner it would fit??? I would do what ever it takes to get the tension off the power cords.
Magnificent job on restoreing that saw
 

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See the last pic concerning my question. The directions call for the bolt that holds the on/off switch to go through the hole on the left. But because of the webbing under the table, I couldn't get it on without tilting it to one side. So I used the hole beside it. The only reason I mention it is because I had to put the cords under a little bit of tension to reach that second hole. Anybody else ever have this problem?
It looks like if you grinded the top corner it would fit??? I would do what ever it takes to get the tension off the power cords.
Magnificent job on restoreing that saw
I agree with Daryl. Tension on your power cords with the vibrations will eventually ware them out. A little tune up and you should be ready to go.:thumbsup:
 

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I would consider drilling a new hole if you have to. We are splitting hairs. That cord will probably be fine for years, but down the road it will wear quicker with tension. I just got done redoing an old saw. I made the mistake of aligning the blade to the fence first. You align the blade to the miter fence slot, then align the fence. The top looks great. I get as much enjoyment from adjusting and fiddling with tools as I do from building with them.
 
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