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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive been busy with a few projects over the last few months but havr only had basic hand tools at my disposal, i recently bought a table saw but am extremely inexperienced with such a tool.

I have an issue now where i need to cut a block of maple 220mm l X 130mm w X 90mm d

I need strips cut off at 220mm l X 90mm w X 6mm d

My table saw however only has a cuttinh depth of 80mm, i need it to be just over 90mm, can i just cut the length and flip the block over and cut the other side?

Please excuse my ignorance, as i said i am inexperienced with such a tool..
 

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where's my table saw?
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Yup, that's a common procedure

Just be aware that your block should be very square and have flat sides and square corners. Otherwise when you flip it "end for end" you will have an offset on the new faces. AND if the block shifts because it's not square, it may bind and kick back.

You should really watch some You Tube videos,get a good book on the operation of the table saw and if possible take a class at Woodcraft or find an experienced mentor. Improper/unsafe operation of a table saw can result in serious injury. Learning by "doing" is not the safest method in this case. :no: An based on your post, you need some experience before you dive right in.


Another suggestion for the question you posted is to NOT cut more than half way through with each pass, leaving a very small strip in between to keep the two pieces still joined. Then after pushing them completely through , using your push stick... onto your new "outfeed" table that you just made :laughing: based on the following video...... you can cut them apart with a sharp handsaw.

Did the saw come with any blade guard or splitter?


 

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Yes you can. Be sure your throat plate will not let the 6mm strip go thru it.

I would cut 1/2 way thru and flip it over to finish the cut.

Most important, before you use the saw, is to get info on safe operation of a ts.

Most important, is to get info on safe operation of a ts.

Most important, is to get info on safe operation of a ts.

Lots of 9 finger (or less) woodworkers out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes it did come with both, but ive neglected to install those, i think they could just get more in the way than would be of assistance, a riving knive however could be considerably beneficial..

I have had my dad assist me on a large scale providing me with some safety tips, but it really does boil down to some common sense..

It is mostly just techniques than i need to learn, what you can do on a table saw, and what its limitations are..

But as you said, some woodworking classes would be greatly beneficial.. Any links to some decent online courses?
 

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Yes it did come with both, but ive neglected to install those, i think they could just get more in the way than would be of assistance, a riving knive however could be considerably beneficial..
Yeah, a blade guard can get in the way of you losing a finger and a splitter gets in the way of the kerf closing up on you and throwing the work piece across the shop.

I'd install them if it were me.
 

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where's my table saw?
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you will pay for dvd's

That link above from Woodworker's Guild of America is one ofe the best You Tube sources for various operations.


Another is:

And another:
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
HOLY POTATO!!!

My blade gaurd and splitter is most definitely being installed before I power up my TS again...

These videos should be a requirement to watch before even being allowed to purchase a TS.

I knew these babies were dangerous, but never quite obviously realised the full extent of just how DANGEROUS!

wow, ok... uhm, TS for sale? Makes me almost want to stick to purely hand tools! Thanks for the words of caution, I will most certainly make myself 100% familiar with my TS before using it again, I guess im lucky to still be a member of the 10 finger club considering my ignorance of the machine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The other problem I noticed (as a result of being a cheapy hobby TS) is that the rip fence is pretty inferior, hardly ever runs parallel to the blade. As i tighten it up it has a tendency of skewing slightly (which seems as a kickback accident waiting to happen).

Is there a cost effective way to rectify this? Or am I going to have to make a plan for a new fence? Or worse, will I have to rather just replace the whole TS?
 

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The other problem I noticed (as a result of being a cheapy hobby TS) is that the rip fence is pretty inferior, hardly ever runs parallel to the blade. As i tighten it up it has a tendency of skewing slightly (which seems as a kickback accident waiting to happen).

Is there a cost effective way to rectify this? Or am I going to have to make a plan for a new fence? Or worse, will I have to rather just replace the whole TS?
Depends on what saw you have, perhaps it is just matter of tuning the saw. If the fence always skews in one direction it could be that the sliding part at the front of the saw is not attached to the fence at 90 degrees, something to check and adjust if possible.
 

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Definitely look into aligning your fence parallel to the blade. Both the fence and blade should be parallel to the miter slots. I don't mean just close either. There should be a way to get everything aligned, although you may need a micrometer.
 

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That 'Kickback on camera' video is really sobering. I have to think that guy could have lost a finger on camera if he'd been leaning with a few pounds more pressure on that block.
 
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