Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm having an issue and need some advice. To start, my saw: ridgid 4510, fence is straight, blade and fence are square to the miter slots.

So my issue has to do with the last 6 inches or so of my rip cuts. I try and keep the board flush to the fence, but when I'm almost done the board tends to drift away from the fence, at the back of the fence. I use a feather board so the board is always flush with the beginning of the fence. I hope that made sense.

Any tips or suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Your feather board should be as close to where the stock enters the blade without being across from the blade. I hope this is clear.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
Sounds like your putting too much pressure on the feather board. I don't use one but I use a push stick with a long nose to keep things straight. Never have problems doing that way...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I tend to make the feather boards a little snug, maybe I'll back off. I try to use my gripper for wider boards and a push stick for the narrow ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
I don't hold the boards near the fence side... always in the middle paying attention to keep the board riding the fence. I also don't have board size limitations for the push stick. Every rip operation on the ts is always done with a push stick.

If you feed your stock by pushing on one side, the board will tend to drift towards the opposite side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
As mentioned, it is important to push at the center of the stock , between the blade and fence.
I uae a Vega Stock Feeder for most rip cuts. It has a canted wheel, that acts as a hold down, and pushes the stock into the fence. No need to physically push the stock into the fence. Just push it thru with a stick.
It really helps ripping sheets of ply.
The 2nd part of the stock feeder is an anti kick back preventer. I almost never use that part.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Walleye vision. Are you sure the edge of the board contacting the fence is flat a straight? In other words, did you joint the edge of the board. I have noticed that on some boards I have tried to rip, were not jointed correctly and edges were not flat and straight, causing the board to veer left of the fence on the outer end or to not be flush with the fence on the entering side of the blade. Just my $0.02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yank,

I've had the problem when using jointed boards. I really think it is where I'm pushing from. I am maybe a little too afraid of the blade. Looking back, even when ripping wide boards I've been pushing next to the fence instead of at the middle of the board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Are you using a roller setup to help support the board you are cutting? I know that I have had a problem in the past just like you described. The last few inches wanted to pull away from the fence. Turned out my rollers were slightly angled causing the board to want to move to the left. I don't know if that is the case here, but something to be aware of.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,737 Posts
you can add a fence extension

I have found that the longer the fence the straighter the rip. My Delta Unifence is 43" long, the Biesemeyer is 42". It's like having a board straightening jig built in.
Here's why. Let's say your board has a slight curve... (... and you want to rip a straight piece off. As you press the curved side along the fence it will eventually lose contact and fall away at the end. Now the curve is being duplicated on the cut off, rather than a straight rip.
If you simply place a straight edged aluminum extrusion between the curved edge and fence it will act like a fence extension and the curve will not come into play. I am speaking of a concave curve here, not a convex one, ... ( .... like this against the fence.

There is a fellow on You Tube who advocates for the use of a short fence which stops at the front of the blade for protection against binding and kickback. He has solved a problem, but created another. The longer the fence, the better, in my opinion. A splitter will keep the kerf open if it closes and will maintain the work against the fence, since it can't rotate away. I use mine consistently now once I understood the physics involved. :yes:

 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top