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I recently purchased a DW745. I was ripping a piece of pine tonight and even though I got it through with no issues I felt like it was fighting me. It wasnt smooth to get it through.

Even after the cut I took the keeper piece and put it back through with the saw off in between the blade and the fence and it was still fairly hard.

Any suggestion? Is this how its suppose to be? Im a newbie to table saws.
 

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Often times when ripping the piece closes up behind the blade and is pinching the riving knife. You're then really struggling to push the riving knife through the closed piece, which can be tough. You'll notice some rips are much easier/harder than others because of this.

If all of your rips are hard, then you have a different issue.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Take some measurements first

Measure from the blade over to the right side miter slot at the front and back of the blade using a tri square. Both measurement should be the same

Now measure from the slot over to the fence in a locked position OR slide the fence over to just within the right edge of the right slot and see if the space is parallel to the slot when it's locked.

These two measurements are critical for the saw to perform as it should.

Next if there is a splitter plate, see if that plate is parallel to the blade using a steel straight edge on both sides of the blade. It should slide past the blade and NOT bump the splitter plate. This is also critical for the material to not bind on the plate.

Finally, Pine is notorious for closing up on the splitter if you have one, and binding. Insert a wedge in the kerf when the saw blade is stopped and proceed. Wax the plate to allow the wood to slide more easily.


That should cover it....except if your blade is DULL or gummed up, Change the blade or clean it in Simple Green or mineral spirits in a pie pan....

That should cover it.... the blade, that is... :blink:
 

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Old School
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We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions.

Sounds like you might have the wrong blade on the saw. What exactly is it?










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Could be the condition of the saw surface. Even polished cast iron can get sticky. I would lightly buff all the surfaces that the wood has to slide on and the fence with steel wool or fine grit sandpaper and then put a nice coat of J wax on everything. That should significantly reduce the effort needed to feed the wood through the saw.

Bret
 

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John
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I recently purchased a DW745. I was ripping a piece of pine tonight and even though I got it through with no issues I felt like it was fighting me. It wasnt smooth to get it through.

Even after the cut I took the keeper piece and put it back through with the saw off in between the blade and the fence and it was still fairly hard.

Any suggestion? Is this how its suppose to be? Im a newbie to table saws.
Hi Tommy - I just bought a 745 myself and, while I like the rack and pinion fence arrangement, I managed to get the fence clipped in crooked on my very first try.:blink: The cutouts on the plastic fence ends need to have the locating screws on the carriers centered in them on both the front and rear.
It's been my experience that fighting any tool is not a good thing, something is wrong. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Everyone! So it seems my blade is squared. My fence on the other hand had to be adjusted slightly. Literally 2 to 3 taps inwards and now it seems straight. I haven't made a rip cut yet with this new setting (its 11:24pm) but I did pass through the final piece and it seems to be going through with no problem with no power on.

This is prob the fourth cut I made with this saw and the blade that came with it.

How often do you guys adjust your fence and blade?
 

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This is prob the fourth cut I made with this saw and the blade that came with it.
This could be part of the problem. Most often the blade that comes with the saw is junk. I'm not sure what kind of blade yours came with but I would say a decent blade will probably make a great deal of difference.
 

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The best blade for a table saw is a combination blade---most cutting on a table saw is ripping---which generates long shreds of sawdust----so a courser toothed blade works best---a fine toothed blade is for cross cutting---you will experience slow cut--uplift on the work piece and even burnt cuts if you use a cross cut blade in a table saw when ripping---
 

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John
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I bought a 745 two weeks ago and mine came with a 24 tooth, thin kerf rip blade. Dewalt construction line. Likely not the best for rip quality but shouldn't be binding at all.
I'm thinking he has an assembly problem. That fence uses a rack and pinion adjustment and the front and back carriers have locating screws that would need to be adjusted if the fence isn't right. Whacking with a hammer would be a temporary fix and possibly damaging. :thumbdown:

EDIT - page 9 of the operator manual covers blade and fence alignment. Nowhere is a hammer involved.
 
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I recently purchased a DW745. I was ripping a piece of pine tonight and even though I got it through with no issues I felt like it was fighting me. It wasnt smooth to get it through.

Even after the cut I took the keeper piece and put it back through with the saw off in between the blade and the fence and it was still fairly hard.

Any suggestion? Is this how its suppose to be? Im a newbie to table saws.
Look very closely. I think that you may find that the distance between the front on the blade and the fence is more than the distance between the back of the fence and the blade. It may be very little difference, but that could cause a bind.

George
 
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