Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be gluing up a table top without a jointer. I have a portable table saw that I have used on smaller projects with good results, but this time I will be running 10’ boards.
It is my understanding that if I run one board ‘top side’ up and the next board top side down, the joint will line up regardless of discrepancy in trueness of saw blade.
I was also thinking I could get them close on the table saw, dry fit, clamp them down, run a circular saw down the joint, and obtain a perfect joint.
Which method would be best?
 

· Registered
Termite
Joined
·
9,444 Posts
A lot of shops don’t use a jointer when making raised panels. Starts with the Saw, blade and then an understanding how to cut the boards…

A router and a straight edge works well too..
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
I was also thinking I could get them close on the table saw, dry fit, clamp them down, run a circular saw down the joint, and obtain a perfect joint.
Which method would be best?
This would be a better approach for 10 ft long boards, because the saw kerf will "split the difference" literally, between the boards.
A short fence will not make for a straight cut.
A straight edge guide would work for one board at a time, but running the kerf between two boards will pretty much assure a "mating edge" on each.
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
I agree your portable table saw will not produce straight edges in 10' boards. Your biggest issue will be getting a 10' long straight edge to run a router or circular saw against. WNT offers the best solution for the long edges you propose. I have done 6' glue join edges on my table saw, but it has a dead accurate fence and a glue rip carbide blade, along with a long outfeed table to support the workpiece. I also use biscuits in table top assemblies, but I'm probably the only one in the world that does so.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29,448 Posts
I am going to be gluing up a table top without a jointer. I have a portable table saw that I have used on smaller projects with good results, but this time I will be running 10’ boards.
It is my understanding that if I run one board ‘top side’ up and the next board top side down, the joint will line up regardless of discrepancy in trueness of saw blade.
I was also thinking I could get them close on the table saw, dry fit, clamp them down, run a circular saw down the joint, and obtain a perfect joint.
Which method would be best?
They make a special glue joint blade that would work better. Personally I don't like to glue up a sawn edge. The texture the saw makes on the edge holds the wood apart a little. I think the joint would fail sooner than if the edges were properly jointed. It's not just the texture, a jointer would straighten the wood to where there are no gaps when dry fitted together. Any little gap a clamp will have to force the wood together. The amount of force you use to force the boards together will be the amount of force the wood will use to try to pull the joint apart.
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
You're never going to get a good enough edge on a table saw.

The technique WNT described can work, but I would use a router, not a saw. You'll get a better surface with no tear out.

You can also use a straight edge and a router.
You can't "freehand" a router between two boards without wobbling all over.
You must use a straight edge if using a router.
A router is a "single point" cutter, a circular saw has a 6" wide surface to help steer the blade.
There is some controversy about how much gap affects the strength of a glue joint.
Depending on the set of the teeth on the blade there will be some scoring on the pieces.
You can test that out before making your pass betweeen them.

This is an interesting series of tests on glue gaps:

Destroying gluing myths, end grain:
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
4,781 Posts
You can't "freehand" a router between two boards without wobbling all over.
You must use a straight edge if using a router.
With either one I figured a straight edge was assumed. At least I wouldn't try it without one :oops:

Rebel illustrates what I'm talking about, and you can see the tear out with a circ saw. It would be minimal with a spiral router bit. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
With either one I figured a straight edge was assumed. At least I wouldn't try it without one :oops:

Rebel illustrates what I'm talking about, and you can see the tear out with a circ saw. It would be minimal with a spiral router bit. :)
So, would the boards be touching when using the router method? Would leaving a small gap allow easier cutting?
 

· Registered
Termite
Joined
·
9,444 Posts
So, would the boards be touching when using the router method? Would leaving a small gap allow easier cutting?
it’s done with laminate, but I’d skip this method on heavy woodworking..

If using a route4 just use the straight edge to run one side flip jig and do the other..

With a router, just leave a 32nd exposed and route it off..
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
So, would the boards be touching when using the router method? Would leaving a small gap allow easier cutting?
Makes no difference as long as both boards are cut along entire length, yes a gap will make for easier cutting.
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
I am going to be gluing up a table top without a jointer. I have a portable table saw that I have used on smaller projects with good results, but this time I will be running 10’ boards.
Because your boards are 10 ft long you can't use the factory edge off an 8 ft panel as a straight edge guide.
You'll need to make one at least 10 ft long or find a straight section of steel bat as I did to edge rip 14 ft long boards for a trailer deck
My steel bat was only 10 ft long, so I clamped it and made a pass, then slid it down carefully keeping it straight along the kerf I made and reclamped it to finish the last 4 ft:
View attachment
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I’ll echo that you can get glue line cuts from a table saw. But a Forrest WWII in a cabinet saw can still leave marks if you’re not careful. I can’t see getting a 10’ board across a table top saw cleanly. I think a circular saw will not leave a clean edge either.
Since you seem comfortable with running the board across your table saw I would use that method then come back with a hand plane to clean up the cut. You could clean up the circular saw cut too but my guess is it would leave you with more to clean up. If you have a 12’ strait edge then the suggestions to rout the edge to clean it up is probably the way to go.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top