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I have an issue that I hope this knowledgable group can help me with. I have a Steel City 10" contractor table saw that I have had for a couple of years and been very pleased with. It made cuts with ease using a Rigid general purpose blade. Last Christmas, I got a Freud Premier Fusion Thin Kerf general purpose blade. After installing it, the saw started bogging down and burning wood when making some cuts. This happened no matter what I was cutting, including plywood, pine or poplar. It happened if I was ripping or crosscutting. I followed the suggestions that came with the blade and went back through my saw and checked everything. I did find the miter slot to be a little out of parallel with the blade. I got it set correctly and it improved somewhat, but still not back to the way it was before. I put the Rigid blade back in and the saw still strained making some cuts. I'm not sure what else it can be. It makes the cuts, but it is not running like it should. I know this is a long post, but I'm pretty frustrated with this issue and hope to find a solution here. When a tool stops working like I know it can, it takes some of the enjoyment out of my woodworking. Thanks for reading. If any more details are needed, please ask.
 

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Dumbest Smart Person
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Has anything else changed in the shop near the time you swapped blades? Have you added anything else to the circuit that's powering the saw? Is it running on 240 or 120 volts?
 

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The miter slots serve as an excellent reference point, but it's the blade to fence alignment that needs to be spot on for good rip cuts....be sure to double check that. I'd also check the belt tension, pulley alignment, check that the arbor spins free. Raising the blade slightly higher might help a little, but it certainly won't be a cure. Be sure your blades are clean.
 

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Old School
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Check everything electrical. That includes all cords, plugs, switches. Blow out the motor, and the insides of the saw. Check the belt(s), and pulleys to see if there is any slippage. The motor may have a start and a run capacitor. If so, check them both. Make sure the arbor stop and arbor is clean, and the blade nut and washer is seated properly and tight enough.

What blades exactly are you using...tooth count and type of teeth.






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are you sure both blades aren't dull? was the new freud a full kerf vs a thin kerf? how many hp motor?
 

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Don't know why I'm even responding....I HATE TS's,haha.

But this could be a BS motor so I'll bite.Once past the blade(it's new)...all elect. connections,pulleys,belts,wedged cuttoffs,etc.etc.

The first line of "offence" on a single phase motor is its capacitors.And will stop right there......assuming you've checked "everything" else...look at them next.
 

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where's my table saw?
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either of 4 issues

The blade, the drive system/motor, the electrical circuit and the fence and blade alignment.

The blade should be clean and sharp.
The drive system, especially the belt tension should be verified as correct.
The electrical supply to the motor, the cord, plug and switch should be checked as well the power circuit to the receptacle.
The blade and fence should be verified as parallel to the miter slot.

Having that all checked and verified.... means it's probably the motor.
Motor failure is usually preceded by a hot burning odor, or just plain nothing happens when the power switch is turned on, but that's not your case. If you feel comfortable, "overfeed" a piece of stock into the blade and listen and watch for the belt to slip or any unusual sounds from the motor. Good luck.:yes:
 
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