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I have the Craftsman 15" drill press (model 137.229250). I have never used this feature before, but I recently wanted to turn the table 90 degrees to drill into the end of a board. The manual shows the bevel locking bolt and the bevel locking pin under the table. The manual says to "tighten the nut on the locking pin clockwise to release it from the table support". I used a socket wrench to tighten it several turns. When loosening the larger bevel locking bolt, the table becomes free enough to wiggle around, but it will still not rotate. I tried tightening the locking nut some more, but it seems to turn without moving. I kept tightening it for several minutes, but it never unlocked, and never seemed to move or get tighter or looser. It is too stiff to turn with my fingers, but easily turns when using a socket set with enough resistance to rachet on the back stroke. I tried pulling the locking bolt with pliers to see if it would disengage, but it did not help.

Can anyone explain how the locking bolt is supposed to work, and what to do if it seems to fail to disengage?
 

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What about the set screw mentioned in the manual?

"1. To use the table in a bevel (tilted) position, turn the locking screw (2) with the hex key counterclockwise to release it from the table support.
2. Loosen the large hex head bevel locking bolt (3)"

I would expect the large hex head bolt is normal thread so anti-clockwise to loosen.
 

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What about the set screw mentioned in the manual?

"1. To use the table in a bevel (tilted) position, turn the locking screw (2) with the hex key counterclockwise to release it from the table support.
2. Loosen the large hex head bevel locking bolt (3)"

I would expect the large hex head bolt is normal thread so anti-clockwise to loosen.
On My drill press there is no (2) hex head locking set screw. There is a bolt inserted into the polished facing against which the bevel turns. It protrudes through the table support housing and is secured with a nut, There is no way the table will bevel with this configuration. It came from the factory this way. Has anyone encountered this?
 

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I might have the same drill press

I have removed the table from mine to save weight when adjusting the height. There is a center pivot bolt which can be removed. There is a pin, no threads, that located the table at different angles. It just pulls out. Turn it to free it up and then pull it out. If you can, post a photo or two of what you have.
 

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I have the Craftsman 15" drill press (model 137.229250). I have never used this feature before, but I recently wanted to turn the table 90 degrees to drill into the end of a board. The manual shows the bevel locking bolt and the bevel locking pin under the table. The manual says to "tighten the nut on the locking pin clockwise to release it from the table support". I used a socket wrench to tighten it several turns. When loosening the larger bevel locking bolt, the table becomes free enough to wiggle around, but it will still not rotate. I tried tightening the locking nut some more, but it seems to turn without moving. I kept tightening it for several minutes, but it never unlocked, and never seemed to move or get tighter or looser. It is too stiff to turn with my fingers, but easily turns when using a socket set with enough resistance to rachet on the back stroke. I tried pulling the locking bolt with pliers to see if it would disengage, but it did not help.

Can anyone explain how the locking bolt is supposed to work, and what to do if it seems to fail to disengage?
Yes, I know this is an old post, but it is the only post that was on-topic that I found. I have a model 137-219090. It has the same adjustments as you describe.

I finally got mine to work. I did not remove the table, but here is how I am confident that things work.

The bevel locking pin is nothing more than a piece of threaded bar stock, with its inner end not having any thread. The inner end is likely riding in a track that is slightly smaller than the bare pin end. The pin is just supplying a little pressure to hold things in place. Tightening its nut backs the pin out. My pin did come completely out.

To reinstall the pin, unscrew the nut all the way out, until the face of the nut is flush with the end of the threaded portion. This will provide a surface for a drift pin. Once you have loosened the bevel locking bolt, aligned the table and tightened the bolt, just seat the pin by driving it in, gently. You do not screw the pin in by turning the nut, as the instructions seem to say.

If I ever lost my pin, I would not replace it. IMO, it is useless. I hope this helps folks.
 
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